Fleurs de Rocaille (1933) Eau de Toilette

Fleurs de Rocaille (Eau de Toilette) by Caron
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Fleurs de Rocaille (Eau de Toilette) is a popular perfume by Caron for women and was released in 1933. The scent is floral-woody. It is still in production.

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Perfumer

Ernest Daltroff

Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBergamot, Gardenia, Rosewood, Violet
Heart Notes Heart NotesLilac, Iris, Orris root, Jasmine, Lily-of-the-valley, Mimosa, Narcissus, Carnation, Rose, Ylang-ylang
Base Notes Base NotesAmber, Musk, Sandalwood, Cedar

Ratings

Scent

7.5 (68 Ratings)

Longevity

7.5 (47 Ratings)

Sillage

6.5 (44 Ratings)

Bottle

7.8 (54 Ratings)
Submitted by Kankuro, last update on 23.10.2019
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Reviews

8.0 7.0 8.0 9.5/10
Augusto

0 Reviews
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Augusto
Augusto
Greatly helpful Review    9
The scent of women
Dry, grey, flannel, silk scarf. Updo. Strict, elegant.

So the first impression, this fragrance is clearly a middle-aged lady. Everybody can choose the right time for himself.
You turn around, the fragrance is attractive, certainly old-fashioned for many, but distinguished and with a unique selling point.

I am very happy to try this fragrance in the 1933 version.
The distance and also the light melancholy fits to this time of stress.

The fragrance is classically floral. Past oriented like the big bouquets and also unchanged modern like Chanel No5. But in comparison, it is more minimalist, despite the abundance of flowers that combine here to a soap-clean veil.

Especially for me the covered grey note is:
The dry grey refreshes and centers. Collecting pebbles is not for nothing always a not to be despised leisure activity of many a holidaymaker.

I like it better than Chanel No. 5, which I, AugustA, always find too opulent to wear. This one is just as aldehyde-floral, but, insulated, bright, not exuberantly radiant. Like a pebble, it also has mica, but it captivates with its grey smooth surfaces, especially if the water has worked on it for a long time and polished it smooth and round. Also in FdR you can find the brilliance and the depth of the water. It mumbles quietly and clearly like a stream.

By the way, these stone (garden) flowers are spotlessly clean. Here no wrong thoughts come up.
The over-powdering of the soapy flowers is delicate and never dusty. The light powder gives the fragrance a soft surface so that the sometimes harsh soap is beautifully rounded off and the transition is smoothed by the floral heart so that its gate to the wood opens early.
It comes with the base a little more warmth into the picture. Carnation soap, sandalwood, a hint of the Orient, perhaps from the pattern of the silk scarf that nestles around the lady's neck.

The scent stayed in the cloth for a long time, it still smelled the next day.

p.s.: By the way, the fragrance is worn by the professor of history in "Women's Fragrance", quite at the end of the film. Al Pacino just knows the good scents...
7 Replies
8.0 7.0 7.0 9.0/10
Yatagan

0 Reviews
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Yatagan
Yatagan
Greatly helpful Review    54
A legacy: our family fragrance
The headline is perhaps misleading, because the fragrance is by no means a favourite of our family, but actually almost the opposite - and that was the case: I've always had a strong penchant for classics and that's why many years ago I gave my mother this fragrance, which comes from the distant and gloomy year 1933 and must not be confused with the newer, completely different Fleur de Rocaille (without plural "s" behind the flower) from 1993. In fact, my mother didn't like the fragrance very much, which I learned much later, and it was soon found in my grandmother's collection, which I'm pretty sure wasn't used too often, at least I don't remember her wearing it (she preferred Scherrer No. 2 at the time). When my grandmother died, her scents (and I find that appropriate and touchingly beautiful) migrated to the collections of her daughter and daughter-in-law (Scherrer No. 2 and Penhalgon's English Fern inherited my aunt, the other scents my mother). Somehow Fleurs de Rocaille found herself there and my mother confessed during a visit that the scent was too soapy for her. Since she had no use for him, I took him with me. At home he stood like Cinderella for a while beside the other scents of my wife, who didn't really appreciate him either. Since I have been testing a lot of aldehyde based scents, soapy scents and chypre scents in the last weeks, Fleurs de Rocaille fit well into all schemes and I pulled him out. I noticed that I had rated him well at the time (8.0). Cinderella is a pretty girl, even if she comes from another time. Apparently, as a male offspring in our family, I am the only one who appreciates this ladies (?) fragrance and also likes to wear it as a man. After a longer test I now rate the fragrance even higher and am happy about wonderful aldehyde blossoms with clear soapy accents. Although aldehydes are not even mentioned in the fragrance pyramid, they have already been noticed by other testers* and are unmistakably present from the head to the heart note. In this phase, Fleurs de Rocaile obviously bears a strong resemblance to Chanel No. 5. Here, too, a chypre texture is recognizable, as the fragrance contains bergamot, rose, jasmine and musk; however, for the typical chypre triad, both fragrances lack a strong dose of oakmoss (presumably contained, but much more sparingly than the phenotypic chypre). A special attraction of the chypre fragrances, however, is their changeable structure - and oak moss can be replaced by patchouli, vetiver, sandalwood (Chanel No. 5) and musk. This is also the case here and so there is obviously a relationship with the Chypres. In contrast to Chanel No. 5, the aldehydes in the "stone flowers" do not shimmer like the lights in a clear starry night, but lie behind a cloud cover. That's just as nice, by the way.
43 Replies
10.0 10.0 10.0 9.0/10
SuzanneS

40 Reviews
SuzanneS
SuzanneS
1
Vintage EDT
Vintage EDT
Al Pacino in "Scent of a Woman" referenced this scent.
It is all woman. Huge aldehyde opening of soapy goodness from a bygone classic era. The rose and ylang add sexy richness to the feminine lilac. Lilac. Not seen a lot in todays scents. Gorgeous. This is the perfect 1950's lipstick, pantyhose, all dressed up scent with pearl earrings and a ton of hairspray. Shes RetroGorgeous!!!
10.0/10
ScentFan

325 Reviews
ScentFan
ScentFan
3
Vintage Fairytale
The previous review prompted me to hunt down a vintage bottle and, sure enough, Fleurs de Rocaille (rock garden) is a classic Caron beauty--no comparison whatsoever to the 1993 Fleur de Rocaille (no s), which misses the former’s bergamot, carnation, musk, and rosewood. Unfortunate, because without them the wicked stepsisters, narcissus and lily-of-the-valley enter and stomp all over Cinderella’s pretty gown. Not so here. Daltroff, a master, knew what to do with these two naughties. Have you ever smelled them in pure form? Narcissus can remind of a public urinal, rotting vegetables, or a swamp (and that’s being kind). Lily-of-the-valley reeks from an acrid edge midway between “ewww, what’s that I’m smelling?” to “oh, my god, get me a gas mask!” Both are potent bullies in the rock garden. Nothing to play with. Unless you’re a genius like Daltroff, that is—how sad that WWII drove him from country and company, never to see his crystal flacons again. So wonderful the glories he left us, all unexcelled.

FdR isn’t exceptional because of its base. Amber, musk, sandalwood and cedar have supported scores of charmers. It’s not bergamot, the sultry citrus. She’s crowned many an enchanting majesty. Even the sweet florals here aren’t fully responsible, though if there was ever anyone who knew what to do with a flower, it was Ernest Daltroff. No, it’s the wicked stepsisters who create this perfume’s glory, making magic out of mere pleasantries. Without opposing characters, Cinderella would have been a forgotten fairytale—girl finds prince, yada yada. Likewise, Daltroff knew that to create a fabulous floral, he needed a thorn or two.

(The 1993 copycat overdid the thorns and reduced the sweetness. No indication of who the designer is, but IMO Fraysse must have been on vacation, if that one's really a Caron.)

I digress. What does Fleurs de Rocaille smell like? Other reviewers have already beautifully said, but picture this. You are on the deck of an ocean liner, possibly the Ile de France. Your heart breaks as you hear a band play La Marseillaise, the anthem of your native country. As the anchor lifts, a woman you secretly love waves from shore. You’ve told her not to cry, but she does, having promised to faithfully continue what you began. Asail in the ocean, it’s hard to grasp what you had to give up to stay alive. You sit on deck, numbly watching the shore of your beloved land recede. Someone walks by--a woman composed and elegantly clothed, trailing a scent you created six years ago. She has an intriguing air of contradictions--worldly but prudent, alluring but modest, unpretentious but rich as sin. You close your eyes and savor memories that whirl on the scent. When the last of it drifts away on a salty breeze, you open tearful eyes and in your heart bid goodbye to your employees who unlike you are not Jews, to France where you were born, and to the company you founded: Parfums Caron.

Thanks, Briarthorn, for calling attention to this tremendous perfume.
5.0 7.5 7.5 9.0/10
Briarthorn

91 Reviews
Briarthorn
Briarthorn
Helpful Review    5
Heart-stoppingly beautiful
This Review is from a mid-1960s bottle of EDT.

This opens with a very green and soapy aldehyde punch that is followed by a whisper of an indolic jasmine. The soap, however, is more strongly ylang-ylang and lilac scented. After this initial punchy opening the lilac and rose fully open up. It’s a pretty and slightly powdery rose. The lilac seems to have a sharp edge as it is blended so well with the Jasmine. It’s more of one note (Lilasmine?) instead of two distinct ones. It takes a while for this scent to fully settle. I feel like I have arrived at a floral class reunion where I need to meander around saying hello to everyone and exchanging pleasantries, “Oh. Hello powdery rose.” “Good to see you again peppery carnation.” “Lovely day Lilac.” Eventually I sit down with a group near the door and settle in for a more in depth conversation in the heart.

Here in the heart a powdery rose comes forward and sits close to the skin. The rose joins up with some ylang-ylang and they blend together to make one of my favorite note combinations in perfumery. I love the way these two florals sing together, both lovelier together than they could ever achieve on their own. Clinging to them is the soapiness from the aldehydes which are still persistent though muted. This soapy bite will follow us to the end of this scents evolution. There is also the lilac still floating around brightening everything up a bit, taking the edge off the soapiness, and dampening down the powder so that we are left with a perfectly balanced composition. I cannot find the words to convey how magical this scent is. It’s expertly balanced and blended, almost heart-stopping in its beauty.

After about eight hours it becomes a skin scent. The dry down has sweetened up a little bit, most likely from the addition of sandalwood. The rose is still very prominent and is more powdery now than it was in the heart. It is incredibly beautiful and once again I am at a loss for the right words to describe it. After fourteen hours I can no longer smell it.

This was a beautiful piece of art to wear and experience. It’s the vision and child of a true master of his craft.
6 Replies
7.5 7.5 7.5 9.0/10
Icekat

97 Reviews
Icekat
Icekat
Helpful Review    5
Epitome of floral elegance
My introduction to this wonderful scent was modern EDT reformulation. The reformulations are often disappointing to me but this one… I instantly fell in love with it. Later on I tracked down the vintage pure parfum, which is slightly different but also incredibly beautiful. What can I say? This perfume is an epitome of floral elegance. The floral bouquet is not shy here but it is utterly beautiful, evocative and expressive. The stunning and slightly dark combination of ylang-ylang, carnation, rose and jasmine is sensual and silky smooth, seductive and romantic at the same time. It feels like a gentle floral silk wrap. I could not believe how smooth and sophisticated this floral is. It manages to interact with a skin in such a natural and organic way that it seems to radiate from the skin and become part of me.

FLEURS DE ROCAILLE composition is complex and exciting with long development arc. In the opening, the pure parfum is stronger and heavier than the modern EDT. The carnations are heavenly beautiful here, and in pure parfum the floral notes are layered on lovely, almost buttery wood notes. There is richness of ylang-ylang and carnation that I find that modern EDT does not have. However, the modern EDT in the opening has this lovely lighter feel, which I love, while still maintaining similar composition as pure parfum. As the scent develops, something magical happens. The scent becomes one of the most gorgeous, gentle floral scents I have ever tried. It is like a light floral mist radiating from the skin. It does not feel like a perfume but like a glowing warm floral skin scent with very gentle violets, rose, iris and white musk. The lasting power is better in pure parfum but I equally love both versions.

I wore FLEURS DE ROCAILLE first time on a nice, slightly cool, calm and clear night in early May and the scent perfectly fit the surroundings. It was utterly romantic and very feminine. This scent is definitely worth trying. It is one of my favorite classic scents. Overall score is 9/10.

Statements

Carlitos01 12 months ago
Today i met a friend of my wife wearing a true alluring vintage lady scent. I could not help asking its name... Fleurs de Rocaille by Caron+2

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