Santos (1981) Eau de Toilette

Santos (Eau de Toilette) by Cartier
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Santos (Eau de Toilette) is a popular perfume by Cartier for men and was released in 1981. The scent is spicy-woody. The longevity is above-average. It is still in production.

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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBasil, Bergamot, Lavender, Juniper, Lemon verbena
Heart Notes Heart NotesGeranium, Nutmeg, Pepper, Rosemary, Vetiver
Base Notes Base NotesAmber, Coconut, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Vanilla, Cedar

Ratings

Scent

8.0 (228 Ratings)

Longevity

8.1 (163 Ratings)

Sillage

7.5 (157 Ratings)

Bottle

7.9 (161 Ratings)
Submitted by Sani, last update on 25.11.2019.
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Reviews

9.0 8.0 9.0 8.5/10
Taurus1967

3 Reviews
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Taurus1967
Taurus1967
Greatly helpful Review    17
Lifted but down-to-earth
At that time Santos and Pasha de Cartier had the most beautiful flacons for me far and wide - at least as far as men's fragrances were concerned. I had bought the Pasha at that time, but in the end I wasn't as convinced of the fragrance as it seemed to me from its stylish, apart container. Santos, on the other hand, was less an option to buy. Probably he was too overblown and exhausting for me, after all, in his young years people preferred something fresh or rather sweet.

If the bottle had continued to be used in its original version, I would probably have been more intensively occupied with it again. Its appearance was strongly based on the Cartier Santos watch model, which in turn was a tribute to the world's first pilot's watch "Cartier Santos" from 1904. Among other things, it was also the first wristwatch with a leather strap and was co-developed by none other than the Brazilian motor aviation pioneer and inventor Alberto Santos Dumont. The reading of his pocket watch while driving his airship was just too difficult, whereupon he and his friend Louis-Francois Cartier thought about the improvement.

Although the bottle is still chic at the moment, it no longer has this extraordinary mechanical proximity to the watch model. This would also suggest that the scent may have changed.

What you get is a still pompous start with plenty of dark lavender and muscaty-peppery spice paired with rose geranium and juniper. It's still quite exhausting, but in the drydown Santos gets a fine soapy-masculine note, tart rather than sweet, with sandalwood, some patchouli and warm amber. Even the coconut can be skillfully woven into the fabric without being perceived as disturbing. Probably for me one of the very few fragrances with coconut that I find extremely pleasant.

In my memory it has been a bit wilder and more dominant, yet Santos is a masculine fragrance with plenty of stamina, but which requires maturity and character from its wearer. On the wrong people, the shot could go back properly and lead to a crash landing.

Too bad because of the beautiful bottle, but I think also so he has hardly lost his radiance and knows how to convince.
15 Replies
9.0 8.0 8.0 9.5/10
Can777

6 Reviews
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Can777
Can777
Greatly helpful Review    40
Character assassination
Or Assassinat de Caractère as the Frenchman says. Now that we're dealing with a Frenchman. That's a pretty bad word, isn't it? Didn't I? What did Santos get to say? Bad things! A fragrance that was very popular in the milieu and worn by dubious figures, they said. That may be, but why shouldn't such people, or rather men, have good and stylish taste? Santos played already in the 80s in the upper league under the men's perfumes. He embodied luxury and money. At almost every arm, finger or neck the house Cartier flashed or sparkled at that time. Be it the watch, the Trinity ring or the ever-popular golden panther. What could be more obvious than to gild yourself with a perfume? Santos was also very suitable for the Lord. The same goes for the unforgettable Must de Cartier for the ladies. Both are connected not only by the house, the reputation and the year of birth, but also by a very special fragrance. The two of us say very "special" made!

Santos
Santos is an incredibly beautiful and warm spicy and woody fragrance. He's got a cool bowl of steel, but a heart of liquid gold. The design of the luxury bottle at that time already shows this very clearly. A relatively cold, metallic entrance made of cool lavender and juniper berries with a metallic-cool appearance open his presentation. The dependence on steel is not so far away and is probably also wanted. After not too long, spicy warmth gradually breaks through. Santos slowly opens its golden heart of freshly grated nutmeg and a dry warm spicy cinnamon accord. A hint of rose geranium adds a slight herbaceousness but no real floridity. But what Santos always had in mind was the sensually charming and deep timbre of his base. Dry tones of unsweet vanilla blend with the fibrous wood of coconut and dusty notes of amber to create a truly devastatingly beautiful base reminiscent of the shimmer of gold. Santos was also said to have a certain very attractive physicality. Which is true, at least in the original version! It contains something that was never listed as a fragrance. Musk, that is It is exactly the same musk that was also present in a completely exaggerated and wasteful form in the unforgettable female counterpart Must de Cartier. The original Santos contains a minimal dose of it. But exactly this minimal dose gave him this sultry, soft-warm and extremely attractive aura. This note has completely disappeared from the new formulation and version. The new Santos is still recognizable, but he has been "disarmed" so to speak. Very unfortunate!

Conclusion
Everything they said about Santos is mostly true. He was a macho,a mobster,and a ripper. Although a charming and very gallant representative of this species and a true gem! He had a cultivated shamelessness, arrogance, and arrogance that sought his equal. Santos was never the loudest, but in his fine, golden Sillage was always luxury and almost shameless self-assertion. Which didn't hurt him. The opposite was more the case. It may be that his reputation has always been somewhat shady, but this made him even more interesting and attractive to men and women alike and a legend. Or how do you say it so beautifully? Once the reputation is ruined, it lives uninhibitedly!

And that... Santos of Cartier has always been perfect!
33 Replies
8.0 8.0 8.0/10
Minigolf

0 Reviews
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Minigolf
Minigolf
Very helpful Review    6
Simply wonderful and spicy
As it is... i can only really judge a fragrance for myself when I have smelled it. The appearance of a bottle doesn't matter at all, only a spray head should be easy to use.
Fragrance pyramids can be an incentive to get to know a perfume, as can comments from users.
But with "Santos" a small sample was decisive for me. I had dabbed on some of its contents and first smelled a "maggi-like" top note, which then lay down to make room for something really better. The little sample was already older, and the smell probably just at the beginning of the "tilting". But all in all later a quite appealing fragrance. By the "Souk" I hold now a completely intact "Santos" in the hands, its "true smell" in my nose and know now that I have done everything correctly with it A wonderfully dark and spicy smell, which also has something "forestlike" about it, delights me on the first try.
A subtle, slightly flowery undertone pushes itself into the fullness and makes everything even "rounder".
Little by little more scent elements are added, fine earthy patchouli, "sandy" wood scents, well-dosed vetyver-injections...everything fits together very cleverly and cleverly to a for me wonderfully spicy-deep scent, which lacks nothing to be a real nose feast.
And it radiates warmth, a pleasant, comforting warmth of the kind that "medical red light" may leave on the skin. Or a warm bath that you take when you're frozen...
2 Replies
10.0 7.0 8.0 10.0/10
Leporello

0 Reviews
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Leporello
Leporello
Greatly helpful Review    13
A monolith
Before I go into detail about Santos, I would like to point out that my comments refer to the current version with the new bottle design (see Must de Cartier). Santos de Cartier has become my absolute fixed star in the perfume sky for some time and has become my signature fragrance far beyond. This was not always the case and took his time, a first acquaintance was followed by a tender appreciation and ended in a love of perfume. Anyone who has read my commentary on L´Homme from Versace will soon have noticed that I am a fan of the eighties and a bit beyond that I am also "retrospectively" inclined. Santos is for me since then an absolute giant in the men's scent sky. Luca Turin once used the attribute "blessing perfumery" in his book "PERFUMES the A-Z Guide" in relation to the older fragrances of Guerlain and I would like to attribute this attribute to Santos as well, but not without explaining how it came about, thus back to objectivity. Santos is a fragrance that initially attracts attention and tries to bribe by its appearance alone. I have rarely experienced a more consistent reduction in the appearance of a perfume bottle. Every sweetness, every playful detail is alien to the bottle and is consistently left aside in favor of a monolithic appearance. So there is a pitch-black, heavy and extremely high-quality hundred milliliter bottle in front of you, whose deep black appearance is only broken through by a small silver band with almost tiny inscription and you suddenly know that the scent does not want to play. Modernity, showmanship, uniformity and playfulness are not what you look for in Santos and you don't just notice it on the outside. Santos knows what he wants (certainly not unlike the name giver) and makes this clear immediately on first application.

Santos opens with a deliciously fresh top note of moist basil, dew-wetted juniper and a delicate dose of lemon verbena. In general, Santos seems to me at this early stage quite warm and spicy with a "tropical" slightly moist start. To my surprise, the top note can last a relatively long time, because only after a little more than thirty minutes do you notice how the spices slowly take over the direction. Here nutmeg is most succinctly represented, of course not ground, but rather reminiscent of a nutmeg, flanked by fresh rosemary twigs and a hint of cinnamon stick. The green-fresh basil and the light citrus notes of the top note still serve as the basis for the beginning spice round. A combination that is both fresh and woody and spicy at the same time and which can certainly be attributed above all to the wood, instead of the grated spice. The heart note is of a durability that I have rarely experienced before, because it lasted for over five hours on my skin, which seems record-breaking to me personally. Only after about six hours comes for me by far the most beautiful and perfect part of Santos. The base note of Santos finally takes its wearer into tropical climes, for the remaining hint of the heart note is "warmed up" once again by wonderfully warm and at the same time dew-wet aromas of coconut, but not by the sticky sweet flesh, but rather by the woody shell of the coconut and fine notes of sandalwood and vanilla. After more than twelve hours Santos sounds absolutely woody and warm and spicy and, thank God, not at all gourmandig-sweet. The durability is therefore beyond all doubt and I do not perceive the sillage as room-filling or overwhelming.

However, I am surprised at the rather divided opinion on this fragrance, especially the attribution of a dubious aura, which has already been mentioned several times. For me, a fragrance cannot be "dubious" if it is the wearer or his attitude to life. But this seems to be an almost typical phenomenon for Cartier, at least if you look at Santos and Pasha, that you combine these two grandiose fragrances with the demimonde or a pronounced macho attitude. I can't judge how well known semi-world or underworld greats smelled at the beginning of the eighties, but I want to make it quite clear that they had more style than today's suburban Strizzis with their miasmatic 1 million cloud. Cartier's chosen testimonial Alberto Santos Dumont and its origin go wonderfully with this fragrance, because I imagine a striking gentleman of the best age flying through the still early and wet morning mist, which carries all kinds of aromas of his tropical home. A man and I mean a real man, and this is not a question of hair, but of attitude, head, behaviour towards his environment, who knows how to behave and who has long since decided not to follow any more trends for himself. Santos is simply remembered as a statement, is striking, stands out positively, can convince and certainly anything but arbitrary. Santos is a monolith that outshines many of today's overly penetrating, chemically enriched and uniform fragrances
5 Replies
9.0 7.0 8.0 9.0/10
Konsalik

0 Reviews
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Konsalik
Konsalik
Helpful Review    11
It's true. It's true: Michael Knight is alive!
I have a certain soft spot for the '80s - at least in fits and starts. Then one RetroWave playlist after the other is being pashed through and Adorno's thoughts on the culture industry and the problem of escapist nostalgia are pushed aside.
When I now read in a comment to "Santos" that a spontaneous association had been "Knight Rider", I simply had to start a test.
To make a long story short: it could never have been formulated more precisely. The warm spicy nutmeg (belongs on every 80s cauliflower dish), the spicy cinnamon lace (at that time there were petit bourgeois desserts without?), the woods polished with Pronto or its American counterpart in Devon's office (perhaps only veneer?), the somewhat cheap, but all the more stubborn leather-smelling leather in Michael's TransAm... Yeah, he must have smelled like that. With good durability and not too exaggerated Sillage.

No, wait, not an American counterpart. It must be pronto. As always, this projection is also tied to the own circumstances of the time to which one refers. I don't know if cauliflower is eaten with nutmeg in the USA. But I know that even in my childhood (born 1985) on the Lower Rhine this 80s bouquet has survived for a long time. Way into the '90s. And I have rarely experienced this time capsule effect so perfectly. At most Tabac Original (grandfather). Even the smell of juniper from the local Schützenfest can be found here...
In short: I will have to buy Santos - not least to be able to return effortlessly now and then to a time in which - and this is the bitter core of many nostalgic spleens - in which many dear people were still there who are no longer alive.
I don't care what Adorno thinks.
4 Replies
7.5 7.5 7.0/10
Missk

1165 Reviews
Missk
Missk
Very helpful Review    5
Powerhouse masculine
I love the smell of the 80's. Back then, scents were loud, in-your-face and unique. Santos de Cartier is the best example of a raw, edgy, incredibly masculine scent from that time period.

Compared to those more modern scents, some may think Santos de Cartier is too strong, too earthy and too different to be worn by anyone today. I tend to disagree.

This fragrance hits you like a surprise punch in the face. For the first few seconds, it's bitter, green and herbaceous. As it settles, it begins to smell somewhat leathery and sweet. I find Santos de Cartier a stronger version of Chanel Antaeus.

There is a definite hint of vanilla and incense, particularly in the drydown, which makes this fragrance suitable for women to wear as well. Personally, I wouldn't feel ashamed to wear such a bold, manly scent like this one, and honestly, I'm fussy.

The rich, dark woodsiness of this fragrance is divine. In lots of ways I'd rather a man smell like Santos de Cartier than those non-descript citrus aromatics that tend to flood the male market these days.

The man that wears Santos de Cartier, is mature and sensible. Honestly, I can't imagine this being worn by or being bought by any young man. This fragrance is for real men.

There's nothing to fear in terms of lasting strength and sillage. Santos de Cartier is quite possibly the powerhouse fragrance of the century. I highly recommend.
1 Replies
10.0 10.0 7.5 6.0/10
Lola82

362 Reviews
Lola82
Lola82
Helpful Review    1
Santos
This one is hard to describe but i do
pick up some Petite grain and Vetiver
but it's drydown is intresting Bergamot
basil and oregino and the sweet aftermath
of vanilla geranium but i'm not noticing the coconut.
this is a male equivulant to Cartier's
Baiser du Dragon women can weat this fragrance
if they can past the first minutes of the opening notes.
i't's a Sexy Fragrance a chick magnent.

Statements

AmberScent 11 months ago
Its blending and notes really marks Cartier Santos as a trustworthy classy fragrance.
It is aimed at a more mature man. A smart powerhouse!+3
Raygsoko 24 months ago
One of my top fragrances albeit the Vintage original EDT but nonetheless, it is superbly blended
8.0
9.0
9.0
10.0
Hermesh 4 years ago
Lush leather scent with slightly sweet dried fruits. Splendid.+1
7.5
5.0
7.5
8.0

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