Dioressence

(1979)
Dioressence by Dior
Flacon Design: Dior
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8.2 / 10     144 RatingsRatingsRatings
Dioressence is a popular perfume by Dior for women and was released in 1979. The scent is chypre-flowery. The longevity is above-average. It is still in production.

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Perfumer

Guy Robert

Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesAldehydes, Bergamot, Fruity notes, Green note, Orange
Heart Notes Heart NotesGeranium, Orris root, Jasmine, Carnation, Rose, Tuberose, Violet, Ylang-ylang, Cinnamon
Base Notes Base NotesBenzoin, Oakmoss, Musk, Patchouli, Styrax, Vanilla, Vetiver

Ratings

Scent

8.2 (144 Ratings)

Longevity

8.1 (93 Ratings)

Sillage

6.9 (94 Ratings)

Bottle

7.8 (93 Ratings)
Submitted by Sani, last update on 17.02.2017

Interesting Facts

This fragrance was reformulated in 2009 by François Demachy according to IFRA guidelines. Since then it is part of the collection "Les Creations de Monsieur Dior".

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Reviews

Bottle 6.0/10
Sillage 7.0/10
Longevity 8.0/10
Scent 7.0/10
An Oak Moss Bomb!
This review is for the original, vintage formulation.

Top Notes: Aldehydes, Orange, Fruity Notes, Patchouli, Green Notes, Bergamot.

Heart Notes: Carnation, Tuberose, Cinnamon, Violet, Orris, Jasmine, Ylang-Ylang, Rose, Geranium.

Base Notes: Musk, Patchouli, Benzoin, Vanilla, Oak Moss, Vetiver, Styrax.

Dioressence was launched in 1979. The nose behind this fragrance is Guy Robert.

To my nose, this is very much a classic chypre despite the fact that there is no labdanum listed in the notes pyramid. I detect a huge oak moss note that dominates the entire composition from top to bottom and from beginning to end. I do detect some florals, most notably rose, geranium, and a tiny hint of carnation, but the florals are dominated by the oak moss and green notes. I detect aldehydes, orange, and bergamot upon initial application, but they fade relatively quickly, albeit not as quickly as the top notes of many of today's fragrances. The one note that characterises Dioressence more than any other for me is the oak moss.

Dioressence smells trés chic, sophisticated, expensive and undeniably old school. It is very much a perfume of its era or even earlier than 1979. In fact, if I did not know better, I would have supposed it was launched in either the 1950s or 1960s. It is difficult to believe that this composition came at the end of the 1970s, just before the vogue for really big Orientals began in the early 1980s.

As it is so unmistakably wedded to its time period, I cannot imagine young women of today wearing Dioressence, but it is nonetheless an exemplar of the very high end chypre fragrances of its time. This is a fragrance for chypre worshippers more than anyone else, and it is a fragrance for those who love and tolerate oak moss very well in large doses. I like oak moss, but this is an oak moss bomb. Anyone who wants to know what real oak moss smells like should sample vintage Dioressence.

Longevity and sillage are good+. Projection is good. I applied it approximately eight hours ago and can still detect it on myself.

Fragrance: 7/10
Longevity: 8/10
Sillage: 7/10
Projection: 7/10
jtd
Helpful Review    5 Awards
elusive
2013–I’ve seen some discussions online about the merits and pathologies of vintage perfume collecting. I’m live-and-let-live on this one. If it feels good, do it. But how far will you go for vintage? Me, not far. Of course my consolation prize is all of contemporary perfumery, so I’m not panicking.

But sometimes you can’t say no, yes? I’ve come across an old/new bottle of Dioressence edt from the ‘90s-‘00s. Dioressence the Tease, the Trap. Purported to have made the progression from old school, animalic grande dame to complete rubbish. To believe the stories, the vintage is the Grail, and the later reformulations weren’t worth pissing on.

So what vintage had I found? Fuck if I know, but it’s interesting. It’s not the monster that I suspect the original formulation was. But is it trash? Not at all. It’s a powdery, spicy oriental-chypre that’s built for human scale. Prim and upright but also tart and musky. More than a bit sweaty, actually. Dioressence has that come-hither yet stand-offish quality that old-school powdery perfumes conveyed so well.

2016— I’ve just found a wrapped and sealed bottle of pre-1980 Dioressence eau de toilette. This is the original version, composed by Guy Robert. It existed in its original formulation from 1969 to 1979 when it was reformulated by Max Gavarry. The bottle I found in 2013 was Gavarry’s.

Gavarry’s reformulation resembles the Robert original in that are both powdery, woody-floral chyprientals in a perfume-genre multi-culti sort of way. Gavarry’s started with a tart, funk-and-powder dynamic and spiciness in lieu of the animalic quality of the original but the drydown failed to keep up. It was tame in comparison to raspy balsamic drydowns found in other ‘70s-style oriental/chypre hybrids like Rochas Mystère and Lancome Magie Noire (both 1978) and Lancome’s Sikkim (1971.) Though both models of Dioressence cover a lot of the same territory, the evolution of the Robert version favors the classic oakmoss/amber drydown of a chypre and therefore seems more coherent. Its path is more logical than Gavarry’s which has its finger in a few too many pies.

From the perspective of 2016 both versions seem dated, but in 1979 I imagine the ‘new model’ read as more contemporary than the original Dioressence. As animal-sourced materials were fell out of favor, rich, spicy notes were used to give perfumes depth and richness. The Gavarry reboot fits in with the Cinnabar/Opium/Ispahan spiced-eggnog perfumes of the late ’70s. The original Dioressence was based at least to some extent on Miss Dior, a floral-animalic chypre from 1947, and would have seemed unstylish and outdated by 1979. Gavarry’s version made sense for its time, but from the angle of 2016, the original has the glamour of the coveted mid-century chypres. The Gavarry is like a ‘70s movie sequel by comparison. Less authenticky.

Dior continued to change Dioressence over the years, the name being the only continuity to the original. Quite unfortunately, Dioressence’s lasting contribution of perfume history is that it started Dior’s trend of continual, unacknowledged reformulation. Look no further than the bottomless pit of Dior Homme and Miss Dior Chérie reformulations. Actually, look further. The unambitious reformulations of Dior’s classics like Diorissimo, Diorling and Diorama—‘Les Créatures de Monsieur Dior’ I believe they’re called—are the logical and regrettable outcome of the repeated tinkering with Dioressence over the years.
Scent 10.0/10
Helpful Review    3 Awards
Dangerous Dior
This is for the vintage edt version in the ribbed glass bottles. Soft, warm, smooth and elegantly spiced. This somehow makes me think of mink coats and cigarettes in long holders. I love it, don't wear it that often but couldn't be without it.
Sillage 7.5/10
Longevity 7.5/10
Scent 7.0/10
2 Awards
Not Your Typical Old Lady Perfume!
I have no doubt that the dark, dry dusty roses and styrax would drive young perfumistas away from DIORESSENCE in droves screaming "old lady" and relaying anecdotes from their grandmother's retirement home. But patience pays off in this case, as the big dusty attic opening evolves eventually into a very modern-smelling slightly sweet patchouli drydown.

The initial aldehydes and citrus do not stand a real chance against their dark competitors, nor do they limn a sunlit path through the passages of this labyrinthine perfume filled with dried floral notes floating in resins. To my nose, this chypre, unlike MISS DIOR, veers much closer to the oriental than the floral aldehyde category.

DIORESSENCE opens as a fairly serious, dark and heavy affair with a somewhat overwhelming sillage. This is definitely not the sort of fragrance you want to reapply during the day--at least not if anyone else is around! Still, I find the complexity of this creation appealing and especially appreciate the surprising patchouli drydown, which has excellent staying power in the edt.
Scent 5.0/10
Helpful Review    2 Awards
Confused
I tested an edt sample from TPC. I love the wet, green opening in this, but it heads straight for business in about 10 minutes ... and that business is patchouli with just a bit of cinnamon & spice. It's quite likable but not what I was expecting from such a revered classic. It would probably wear much better on me in the dead of winter than in the heat of summer.

I later found a half bottle from an estate, and it is a completely different fragrance. It is not a patchouli-based fragrance. Instead, it is an oakmoss-based one, and I don't like it all. Chypre with a capital C.

Does this fragrance have two formulations? It certainly appears that way to me. I like the first one I tested, and I despise the second. Not even the same fragrance imo.
Sillage 5.0/10
Longevity 7.5/10
Scent 6.0/10
Helpful Review    3 Awards
Green and earthy
Dioressence is green, powdery love. I'm a young woman and I really like this fragrance.

The opening is quite strong and chemical in a sense. Dioressence establishes the earthy greeness in the top notes, which is then followed by intense aldehydes and delicate fruits.

The heart makes way for the introduction of beautiful floral accords, mostly white florals, and sweet yet spicy cinnamon. The combination is almost heavenly.

I curse those that call Dioressence 'old lady'. I've never heard such nonsense in all my life. This may be the most recent re-formulated version, however I don't find this fragrance unpleasant in the slightest. The original may have been better, but the most current version still has avid fans.

The drydown is deliciously soft and somewhat sweet. Vanilla is the highlight here, with the patchouli, vetiver, oakmoss and musk creating an atmosphere behind it all.

The lasting power is wonderfully good, however the sillage is quite soft. I like this aspect, as it makes Dioressence quite mysterious. I often wonder why Dioressence is one of Dior's most overlooked fragrances. It's a pity that releases like the Poison series and Miss Dior Cherie tend to shadow some of Dior's earlier masterpieces.

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