Royal English Leather 1780

Royal English Leather by Creed
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Royal English Leather is a popular perfume by Creed for men and was released in 1780. The scent is leathery-spicy. The longevity is above-average. The production was apparently discontinued. Pronunciation
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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBergamot, Mandarin orange
Heart Notes Heart NotesAmber
Base Notes Base NotesLeather, Sandalwood

Ratings

Scent

8.0 (52 Ratings)

Longevity

8.1 (41 Ratings)

Sillage

7.4 (37 Ratings)

Bottle

7.4 (43 Ratings)
Submitted by Kankuro, last update on 24.11.2020.
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Reviews

9
Scent
8
Longevity
7
Sillage
9
Bottle
Chizza
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Chizza
Chizza
Top Review    22  
Creed used to know leather...
A Creed commentary and no Aventus, Viking or whatever ;)
Joking aside, I like Royal Oud from Creed because of the cedar and otherwise I see the label very neutral. It's a pity, though, that it's an adjusted and very classic, old-fashioned leather scent. Royal English Leather, for the proletariat there were other scents (not really serious), but apparently there was not enough demand in aristocratic families. Otherwise it would probably still exist. Which is a real pity, because Creed had an old school leather scent in his program, which reminds me strongly of Knize Ten, but is really more royal. Royaler doesn't mean better but different to emphasize that.

First of all the leather smells like the leather notes from Bel Ami, Knize etc. But it smells more distinguished and that from the first second on. The mandarin makes the difference. Normally I am not a friend of this fruit. Not even in fragrances. But here it raises this old, charming and soapy leather to a remarkable level.
I compare with Knize, whose scent some leather friends might know. Where Knize is denser, more intense and therefore of course more "penetrating", the creation here is lighter, more floating, more introverted and more distanced. After half an hour, bergamot and tangerine retreat, then expose the leather. You can smell that too. The smell reminds me of impregnated leather goods, which in the end is caused by the mixture of amber and leather.

The amber is full-bodied and resinous, but rather golden yellow and gourmand. This makes the brittle leather look like freshly polished again. Here you shouldn't think that this is a case of beeswax. No, this one is one level above that. Gradually it becomes leatherier, but - if you want to call the special olfactory note of the leather like that - it always remains royal.

In the further course it remains pleasantly leathery, here the sandalwood comes into its own as the creed product becomes pleasantly creamy. Not too much, as one is used to from more modern, creamy leather scents, which often show too much sweet facets. This is very successful in its entirety!
All in all, I find the Royal English Leather better than Knize Ten, because it is more delicate and noble. Since Knize Ten is still great and moreover the Creed is only available for exorbitant sums from questionable suppliers, my sadness is limited despite the outstanding rating for me. But of course: whoever still can call it his own like my donor/patron, can be nodded virally appreciatively. And perhaps ask for the address and absence times.
19 Replies
ColinM

516 Reviews
ColinM
ColinM
Helpful Review    2  
Regal yawn
Not the most creative or interesting leather around and definitely unworthy its prices, especially now that it’s discontinued (sorry, “vaulted”), but I can’t really argue Royal English Leather’s quality. It smells good. Almost great, if you’re into classic, waxy, dark, austere “shoe polish-infused” tanning leather scents. True rich and faceted rusty leather, forget today’s stupidly flat and artificial Tuscan Leather-ish stuff. Just think of Knize Ten: Royal is definitely close to it, just adding a whiff of flowers, a very pleasant touch of ambery mandarine giving some “air”, colour and sparkling sweetness to the heaviness of leather, and in the most recent bottles, also Creed’s trademark base of metallic-dusty ambroxan. I had the chance of getting an older bottle of this, and that base accord was definitely not there – it was quite more all about leather and oily shoe-polish like notes (also darker, drier and spicier, overall slightly heavier too).

That’s it: no tremendous twists during its evolution – actually, almost no evolution at all, nothing particularly standing out. But it smells good, very good. It’s rich, distinguished, totally – somehow, slightly pedantically – elegant and austere, with the perfect balance of complexity and simplicity: it’s nearly only waxy, brownish, lived-in leather - done extremely well, with a subtle sort of ambery-floral-mandarine aura giving a perfect hint of bright sweetness, and yet it doesn’t smell boring or simplistic. Not even dated, actually; somehow it does have a “vintage” feel (think of Knize Ten again), and yet its texture feels crisp, clear, without the old-school thickness one may expect from this type of scent. Quintessentially British in fact: unexcitingly impeccable!

7,5/10

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