No. 89 1951 Eau de Toilette

No. 89 (Eau de Toilette) by Floris
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7.5 / 10122 Ratings
No. 89 (Eau de Toilette) is a perfume by Floris for men and was released in 1951. The scent is floral-fresh. It is still available to purchase.
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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBergamotBergamot
Bitter orangeBitter orange
LavenderLavender
NutmegNutmeg
NeroliNeroli
OrangeOrange
Heart Notes Heart NotesGeraniumGeranium
RoseRose
Ylang-ylangYlang-ylang
Base Notes Base NotesOakmossOakmoss
MuskMusk
SandalwoodSandalwood
VetiverVetiver
CedarwoodCedarwood

Ratings

Scent

7.5122 Ratings

Longevity

6.990 Ratings

Sillage

6.287 Ratings

Bottle

7.886 Ratings

Value for money

6.413 Ratings
Submitted by DirkDS, last update on 13.12.2021.
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Reviews

Lavendergold

1 Review
Lavendergold
Lavendergold
   1  
Not of my time
Described as the quintessential fragrance for the English gentleman, Floris 89 intrigued me enough to give it a shot, after doing a bit of research. The different fragrance notes seemed appealing and like something I would enjoy to wear.

Mind you, I'm in my twenties, and of the 20ish fragrances I had the pleasure to acquire, none was as old as Floris 89.

Spraying a few blasts of Floris 89 in my room and on the backside of my hand, I immediately smell the age, the "oldness" of the fragrance. As a novice, I can't quiet put my finger on it, but it smells like something that rather belongs on my grandfather, or maybe even his father, than on me. On my nose, which is used to the likes of Hugo Boss Bottled, Bleau de Chanel, rather modern fragrance DNAs, it smells sort of damp, musty. As I try to keep it on my hand, as to experience all the different fragrance notes, it is rather suffocating.

After approximately 2 hours, it starts to smell a bit woody, which is a major upgrade to the top note that really put me off. But it really is not enough for me to consider wearing it.

I could maybe see an older gentleman wear it, as it was quiet the popular fragrance at the time. I can definitely see what the fragrance is trying to achieve. But as hard as I am trying to like it, I can really not get myself to wear it. Maybe in 20, 30 years, but for someone in his twenties, I would not recommend it, except for maybe the ones that are really into the older, gentlemanly ways.
8
Scent
7
Longevity
7
Sillage
8
Bottle
7
Pricing
Kurai

124 Reviews
Kurai
Kurai
   2  
Jekyll and Hyde
I have a bit of a split personality disorder. Particularly when it comes to taste of perfumes. Usually my gentle side is dominant. Friendly, socially acceptable. Automatically, I will go for a floral or soapy perfume. Occasionally, my sinister personality makes an appearance. At such moments, only ultra-masculines like over-the-top barbershop shaving foam freshness will do the trick.

Floris No 89 seems to have the exact same split personality. A delightful opening of fine British soap, citric and floral. Fancy dandy and for a while in the same universe as my beloved "Habit Rouge” although soapier. HR remains on the dandy side, even when it dries down to its Shalimarish vanilla. However, No 89 undergoes a different transition. The oakmoss and fresh cedar gain intensity. This is where masculinity takes the overhand. Old-school gentlemanly freshness for the rest of the day.

Overall feeling goes from traditional soap to aromatic woody. Not at all modern or trendy, but great quality. Longevity and sillage are spot on. For me personally a great fit, suitable for the more casual days.
0.5
Scent
3
Longevity
4
Sillage
5
Bottle
1
Pricing
DorothyGrace

79 Reviews
DorothyGrace
DorothyGrace
   2  
Not my cup of tea
Not my cup of tea at all for a perfume or aftershave.

For a minute or so the opening smells very slightly of lavender, bergamot, and maybe hiding way way back a touch of nutmeg. In pretty short time everything is taken over by a a surprisingly harsh petitgrain, sharp and bitter.

Another half an hour and with the top notes burnt off completely it becomes a rather nondescript cake shaving soap such as Wilkinson Sword or Boots the Chemist own brand. By an hour it is gone, and I don't get the base notes.

For me this is in the camp of colognes that we used to use for cleaning our hands when out for a picnic in the 1960s, or as an astringent my aunt used on oily hair between washes. I'm thinking 4711, generic Boots the Chemist own brand, and so on, that we used to buy in pint bottles.

This may smell better on someone else, or may need to be applied in gusting quantities and left to die down, but on my skin it is a complete bust. being thin and bland.

The note pyramid looked exciting.
9
Scent
9
Longevity
7
Sillage
10
Bottle
Bondish007
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Bondish007
Bondish007
Helpful Review    8  
Yeah, where is it?
Floris No. 89 also!
After I had sought contact with Agent 007 in February 2020, it was not long before I came across the Floris brand.
Floris No. 89 is the perfume Ian Fleming liked to wear, so Floris belongs to the category "Holy Grail" in the Bond fandom (which I learned to appreciate with Sean Connery and Daniel Craig.
Since I am still a little younger, the UVP of 98,00 Euro has deterred me... "How am I going to tell my mother?" After gentle mentions of an old, English perfume house, my mother became curious, too, and we ordered some scent samples; No. 89 and Neroli Voyage for me and Bouquet de la Reine and Cefiro for my mother.

A week passed, then finally the package arrived and I could test No. 89.
I sprayed a bump on my wrist and smelled the top note:

Slightly lemony, and fresh because of Neroli. Nutmeg went down.

After 20 minutes to half an hour I smelled the heart and it was very flowery until the drydown came: Woody, spicy, like a gentleman!
Just the way I like it
That was the smell test, followed by three shelf life tests, all of which, with 8-10 hours on my skin, were extremely above average for an EDT.
The sillage is less strong than the shelf life, which doesn't take anything away from the fragrance, because I think that the fragrance is something that should discreetly suggest the impression of the gentleman from England.

Conclusion:
Meanwhile I have a 100ml bottle in my closet and No. 89 has become THE perfume for me.
Durability is top! (I usually spray the scent at about 7 o'clock and can still smell it on myself at 4 o'clock now!), Sillage is mediocre, but not bad and the scent certainly not for everyone!

I hope I was able to raise the appetite for this great EDT with my first comment on Parfumo!

1 Replies
9
Scent
7
Longevity
6
Sillage
10
Bottle
Konsalik
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Konsalik
Konsalik
Top Review    20  
On a creamy mission
Fougères lend themselves to evoking comparatively straightforward notions of masculinity and draw from this, at least in the Western hemisphere, their unbroken popularity; the typical components are usually easy to classify - even without analysis, purely from primary experience. Chypres, on the other hand, are not infrequently enigmatic, challengingly unfamiliar, especially for men, as the often densely interwoven flower walls are not easy to separate. (Deceptive) conclusion: pompous-cloudy woman stuff. Yet, as one can learn, floral notes are among the most complex in the entire perfume cosmos and, as is well known, they go a long way, right up to "dirty" and "spicy". A wide field, therefore, which can be used to refine the nose (and thus also the taste judgement - oh yes!). But where can the half-willed Hagestolz, wholly devoted to the classical Colognes and Fougères, take his first steps into the world of orderly opulence (for this could be approximately the definition of a successful gentlemen's chypre)?
A classic English perfume is a very good starting point for explorations in this respect, as its essential components can be assumed to be better known than ever before and its basic structure can therefore be quickly deciphered. Thus, there is still room to isolate and capture the "other" in a descriptive way. The familiar framework only allows the unusual to emerge more clearly.

This is where Floris's old perennial "No. 89" from the fifties comes in and performs an elegant triple jump under the nose of the homely Hagestolz: starting from the traditional citrus-lavender barbershop, the second jump bridges the gap to the bitter orange, which clearly withdraws to the skin: astringent, bitter and slightly waxy at the same time, thus creating a gently rising ramp to the floral heart of this fragrance. The dear user Yatagan speaks of a hairspray note, but I find it, roughly speaking, creamy and cosmetic without being feminine (although No. 89 should certainly also be attractive to women!). Rather a distinguished, almost courteous, "melting" blossom core inside, never overflowing or even getting lost, but always brought into position by the triad of citric, lavender and wood, established as the masculine triad par excellence. It is easy to understand why Ian Flemming wanted to see or smell this very fragrance (besides Trumpers Eucris) on Bond: There is a glowing core that is receptive to amorousness, but in the end the mission is in the foreground! In terms of expression, this fragrance is not dissimilar to Creeds Bois du Portugal, but it is far more expressive and "narrative". What "such a few flowers" can do.

Finally, we send the technical notes for "M" to headquarters: No. 89 has mediocre, but by no means weak durability and sillage. Just the way you want it. By the way, the comment of the user OhdeBerlin almost makes me happy to applaud only the pathetic, reformulated shrinkage of this really famous fragrance. Knowing the lost original composition would probably plunge me into a depressive mood.
11 Replies
7.5
Scent
7
Longevity
6
Sillage
8
Bottle
MajorTom
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MajorTom
MajorTom
   7  
Scent for men who stand with both legs in life
No, it wasn't love on the first sprayer. Not even the second. But anyone who has been involved with fragrances for a while knows that fragrances really should be given a second chance.
F89 starts with a fresh top note, which soon gets lost and then the fragrance drifts off into the rather harsh. I can't really confirm the floweriness mentioned by some comment writers. The tart character (and you can like it, you don't have to), probably due to the moss, is complemented by a fine spice paired with equally fine, always present but never obtrusive woods.
How do you wear this scent? An office fragrance that goes well with Brit-style suits. An everyday fragrance, which comes around the corner without big airs and graces. Not for young dynamists looking for a fragrance bomb after a workout in the gym. And also nothing for the evening club visit, there it seems rather out of place. But a perfect combination with a mohair or flannel suit
10
Scent
10
Longevity
7
Sillage
10
Bottle
Stinki
Translated Show originalShow translation
Stinki
Stinki
   7  
Does anyone know the movie Trainspotting?
where the guy is asked in the interview where he probably sees his weakness and he answers that he suffers from overperfectionism. I like the Trumper fragrances, but they seem a bit harsh or almost a bit clumsy and not mature enough - they definitely have a lot of character but not this class. It doesn't always have to be a big cinema, some days/morning I find the robust simplicity of e.g. Pino Silvestre just perfect. Every day Beef Wellington is also the horror.

But objectively seen as a whole: if No. 89 has a flaw, then it can only be overperfectionism. The fact that a good perfume must have corners and edges is refuted by this great fragrance. Strong associations of English films set in the 20-40s and rural British idylls appear. Ebenson elegant ballroom parties, private men's clubs, as well as dignified afternoon teas. This unbelievable creaminess, without that ever getting annoying or exhausting or even boring and now comes the sharpest thing; you can even use it as a clubscent in my opinion - I think this is due to the Mysore Sandalwood, which as the only Sandalwood makes a mysterious and deeply mystical impression on me. It must have been worked here quite generally with the absolute Top Ingredients, the formula alone it cannot be.

In addition the old-fashioned, slightly green, dry/dusty mossy, but fresh - more neroli than citric - Cologne aspect combined with some soapiness, which takes away the oriental character of the whole thing and unites it to what for me really outstanding British fragrances are. A profound sublime stiffness and understatement, without this always slightly challenging Parisian tone, combined with a certain subliminal mysterious character of Far Eastern or Oriental colonies. Ebenson a tonic that relaxes. This has happened here in an absolute uniqueness and perfection that can never get boring. I am deeply impressed and delighted. I'm commenting here on the older version with Evernia Prunastri.
1 Replies
ColinM

516 Reviews
ColinM
ColinM
Very helpful Review    4  
British soap
N. 89 by Floris is a delightfully old-school “dandy” gem, quite a prototypical British soapy barbershop scent all about rose, lavender, mossy woods and citrus. It’s astonishingly uncreative, but truly impeccable to any extent. And surprisingly rich and good quality even in the current version, which smells absolutely great, round, not overly synthetic or flat as many current versions of old fragrances – or as other inferior, similarly-themed English products like Geo Trumper’s ones (Floris is quite better quality-wise for me). Bronnley’s Gentleman cologne does quite a similar job at a more affordable price, but No. 89 smells probably a bit deeper and more distinguished than that, also more rose-y and powdery. Very classy, very solid, very “gentlemanly”, a tad pedantic yet less boring than it may seem. More than pleasant all in all. British barbers’ soap at its finest.

7,5/10
10
Scent
10
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
9
Bottle
Seerose

88 Reviews
Seerose
Seerose
Helpful Review    0  
On a man I would like it
"No. 89 is a cultivated and complex chypre fragance - fo men. I would appreciate it on a man. Not that I do not like to use certain masculine perfums. But I would not at all use "No. 89"
The top note starts with an acrid lemon scent. Immediately intensifyd by some harsh spices. A short time I am perceiving some flowers like jasmine. But after about 15 minutes the scent is going to blend into a tangy masculine fragance. All spices, the citrous notes, the flowers and now something woody with the bitter note of oakmoss as well as a faint scent of fine smoke are resulting a wonderful masculine perfume with a softening soapy touch.
9
Scent
7.5
Longevity
5
Sillage
7.5
Bottle
Drseid

808 Reviews
Drseid
Drseid
Helpful Review    5  
English Tradition...
If indeed this scent has been reformulated, I can't comment on its latest iteration (as my bottle is vintage) but that said no. 89 is one of my favorites. It has an invigorating citrus opening that wakes you up and gets you ready to take on the world, and then it transitions to a fabulous masculine rose with musk and lavender notes mixed in for good measure at its base. I always wear this scent when I need a confidence boost as it just exudes class and does not smell dated despite its age. Great stuff and highly recommended. 4.5 stars out of 5 for the vintage version.
1 Replies

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