Wellington 1876 Cologne

Wellington (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper
Where to buy
Search on
Search
More
Where to buy
8.0 / 1037 Ratings
Wellington (Cologne) is a popular perfume by Geo. F. Trumper for men and was released in 1876. The scent is citrusy-fresh. It is still available to purchase. Pronunciation
Search on
Search
More

Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBergamotBergamot
NeroliNeroli
OrangeOrange
RosemaryRosemary
LemonLemon
Heart Notes Heart NotesLily of the valleyLily of the valley
RoseRose
Base Notes Base NotesMuskMusk

Ratings

Scent

8.037 Ratings

Longevity

6.928 Ratings

Sillage

6.033 Ratings

Bottle

7.940 Ratings
Submitted by Pazuzu, last update on 25.08.2021.
  • RateRate
  • CollectionCollection
  • ClassifyClassify
  • NotesNotes

Reviews

9
Scent
6
Longevity
6
Sillage
8
Bottle
Mörderbiene
Translated Show originalShow translation
Mörderbiene
Mörderbiene
Top Review    16  
British Trio - A comparative sketch
After pulling Wellington out of the rehearsal tin (thematically true to a former shortbread tin) yesterday, I was forced to understand the connections of the Trio Infernale von der Insel, which have been brought into play here several times, namely and in chronological order Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet and Town & Country. The three are each about a quarter of a century apart, and while fashion and taste experienced the greatest changes in some art movements around the turn of the century - not least due to social and political developments - the development of British olfactory preferences seemed to stagnate.
For a strong similarity between the three fragrance brothers cannot be denied.
Common to all three is a greenish hesperidic prelude dominated by lemons, an underlying or subsequent herbaceous lining, as well as a simple decrescendo with powdery touches at the end.
And yet, on closer examination, differences can be identified.
First of all, a direct comparison shows that Wellington is much more powdery than its scented cousins over the entire course.
And also in terms of content (presumed) differences can be identified. By the way, the pyramids are not much help here - they assume a complete lack of citric notes in Town & Country, and for Wellington no lavender is mentioned. But it's in there, my nose would have to deceive me a lot Beginning with the top note, it can be seen that the lemon in Blenheim Bouquet and Town & Country is very fruity-cesty-sour and is also supported by the typical aromatic lime. Wellington, on the other hand, offers plenty of herb-green bergamot as an equal partner to lemon, and light orange tones are also present. And while Blenheim Bouquet and Town & Country - always within the very similar, previously described framework, mind you - are followed by the herb bed next to the kitchen door, Wellington chooses the flower bed in the other direction. Very subtle indeed and therefore not to differentiate further, I would trust the indicated lily of the valley if a discreet flower powder was mixed into the fragrance.
There is nothing more to say about the fragrance developments, the basic decrescendo is already beginning.

If I had to visualize the connections between the three fragrances, I would do this with an acute triangle: Blenheim Bouquet and Town & Country connected by the short side, Wellington at the more distant, acute-angled corner.

Wellington could also be related to another British - I am thinking of Lords, respectively Douro. There you find the notes and developments that Blenheim Bouquet is going off, as there is the beginning orange prelude, as well as the flowery heart Wellington as the child of Blenheim Bouquet and Lords? Considering the direction of time probably rather the other way round, but thematically this seems quite plausible.

Lovers of other fragrances may shake their heads, 'everything smells the same' - but I have now created the justification for the possession of all three [four(five)] fragrances, so this only affects me peripherally :)
12 Replies
6
Scent
9
Longevity
4
Sillage
7
Bottle
FvSpee
Translated Show originalShow translation
FvSpee
FvSpee
Top Review    31  
Neukölln 3: I wish it were night, or the freshness would come!
Although I'm neither generally anglophobic (I like humour, men's fashion, the Beatles and fish & chips, even in newspaper and with green frozen peas) nor a despiser of traditional English fragrances on principle (I like Eucris, Elite and Imperial Lime, for example, very much), I admit that I often have trouble with the very British men's fragrance sound.

In particular, it seems to me (at least so far) that the Angles and Saxons can't do Cologne. At least not in the continental sense, as it is understood from Madrid via Paris, Cologne and Prague to Istanbul. None that sounds brightly crystalline, citric tingling and cooling. Maybe that's not what you want on a rainy island either? Maybe you want it to be musty-cuddly there, warming like a well-sweathed tweed jacket in the humid autumn air during a fox hunt? Who knows. The only English continental cologne I know, Eau de Cologne by Penhaligons, is perhaps not by chance discontinued for the second time already.

Wellington, named after Arthur Wellesley, the 1st Duke of Wellington, a grave commander and, with Blücher, victor over Napoleon at Waterloo, begins with a five-minute top note that satirises the entire fresh scent spectrum of a traditional Farina colognes in a very small space. Although everything is there (except the lavender), bergamot, lemon, neroli, rosemary, even orange, the thing doesn't lift off fresh even in those first five minutes. Because on the one hand you never get the cologne image in focus: It's like a double vision, like a wavering halo that lets the impression slip sometimes into the soapy and sometimes shrilly into the scouring powder-like
On the other hand, even in this early phase, in addition to the five sixths of Farina, a sixth of an obscure, creamy-brown, gurgling, sultry and oily, sucking oiliness is also present, which I suspected might be some kind of floral, possibly rose thorn (which has no place in a cologne for my limited-horizon concepts). A look into the pyramid of scents confirmed this. After about ten minutes, this musty British aberration, which touches the border of the latrinal, has swollen to two thirds. I could murder the heart note of this fragrance, no matter if it is dagger, candlestick, rope, revolver or whatever else Cluedo offers. If Blenheim Bouquet, which I didn't particularly like, but whose scent impression I've already repressed, is free of it, I like it better anyway.

Then the rotten roses gradually withdraw, possibly into the rotten boroughs so vehemently defended by Wellington in his second career as - miserable - prime minister. After about 15 minutes they occupy only half of the stage, after 45 minutes they are finally gone. Bell ringing!

Then the most pleasant phase of this fragrance begins, which is also by far the longest. I arrive at 15 hours (skinny) and can therefore explain the average score of 6.7 for durability only with autosuggestion ("Colognes don't last long"). This infinite final phase is again promimentally citric and quite fresh (even if it is not radiant, crystalline and summery cooling), but combined with woody-herbal, junipery-spicy and earthy impressions, for which the musk given as the only base note does not provide a sufficient explanation.

Even though I abstract from the expectations that the term Cologne and the many citrus notes mentioned have raised in me, and do not consider Wellington to be a representative of the genre to which this series is dedicated, but simply as a men's fragrance in its own right, I do not think it has been very successful. My opinion means little, especially since the fragrance has been on the market for 150 years and Yatagan and Fittleworth think it's great. But unfortunately it is the only one I have.
25 Replies
8.5
Scent
7.5
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
10
Bottle
Fittleworth
Translated Show originalShow translation
Fittleworth
Fittleworth
Top Review    38  
Birmingham, December 7, 1921
Gentlemen,
the Empire, as you know, was built on the basis of self-breeding, endurance, adaptability and foresight.
Men who had bold visions and implemented them against all odds made Britain great.
It is this attitude that true men are diligent about, even in the lowlands of ordinary, often gray or even ugly everyday life.

When I was born in Small Heath, Birmingham, it was nothing but a dirty place full of lost souls. Drunkenness, violence, dirt and bitter poverty ...
I was determined not to spend my life in this place.
Self-discipline was the key, hardness the remedy. Whoever wants to ascend, whoever wants to leave behind the lowlands of his own origin, must not hesitate, must not be undecided.

Social advancement is inevitably linked to learning the rules of a higher class and adapting to these rules. This applies to manners, this applies above all to clothing and this applies to all those seemingly unimportant details that tell the expert whether one belongs to them or not ...
It would be a faux pas not to wear a stylish suit like a gentleman would.
It would be just as much of a faux pas if the gentleman did not know how to use the appropriate accessories, such as an appropriate pocket watch, a high-quality tie or a matching pochette But that is not all - in all these things that need to be considered, tradition must also be satisfied.
As a gentleman, you have a duty to radiate inconspicuous elegance, and that includes a subtle, pleasant fragrance.

In London, where I was a few days ago, I was recommended such a fragrance in an exclusive barber shop on Curzon Street. I was presented with a bottle of classic beauty that awakened certain expectations in me.
These expectations were met.

A light, refreshing hint of a citrus bouquet opens, only to be immediately complemented by a clean, tart and almost soapy note, framed by a subtle rose.
Rosemary and thyme, I was told, would best tame the southern embers of bitter oranges.
I perceived this fragrance as quite masculine, it is, as I may assure you, without any sweetness.
He also lacks the alcoholic spiciness that so obtrusively pushes into the foreground in cheap products.
Pleasant also the extremely long durability of the cooling freshness, by which this smell distinguishes itself. Even hours after the first application you can still enjoy the respectable depth, which is nevertheless of exceptional decency.
A woody note is added, which is nevertheless reserved, very distinguished in appearance.
With this fragrance alone, the tradition I have already mentioned is shown the respect it deserves by the fact that it was already created in 1876 by court supplier Geo F. Trumper.
It is a fragrance that, with its name and its discipated coolness, stands like no other for everything that has made Britain great.

I may add that even my impetuous brother Arthur couldn't help congratulating me on choosing this fragrance.
I take the liberty, therefore, to recommend the Wellington Cologne to you, gentlemen.

Your very devoted
Thomas Shelby
24 Replies
9
Scent
8
Longevity
5
Sillage
10
Bottle
NotAmused
Translated Show originalShow translation
NotAmused
NotAmused
Helpful Review    4  
With umbrella, charm and lemon
Now that I have found the currently still available old scents from Geo. F. Trumper, I would also like to write something about everyone. I preferred Eucris from 1912 personally as well as here, but now it goes on chronologically.
Wellington dates back to 1876. 142 years ago. In this period of historicism, architecture and art were more backward-looking and oriented towards older styles. And at Curzon Street number 9 in Mayfair/London, Trumpers Barbershop was opened a year earlier. But I digress.
Although Wellington is the oldest trumper scent, it clearly smells the most modern to me. It also stands out clearly from the "Trumper Collection" because it is the only non-woody one among the four. I will spare myself any comparison with other waters here, since Wellington is clearly the older of the presumed twin fragrances, and it should therefore be said, if at all, that this other one smells like Wellington and not the other way round.
After I opened the rehearsal, "Take two lemons!" shot through my head. It smells wonderful of lemon candy, but without being sweet. And that for a respectable 4 hours and more. I've never experienced that in such perseverance. Also there is not this tinny note here, which sticks to some citrus scents after a few hours of fading. Wellington remains pleasant/pleasing until it slowly decays. The radiation is quite restrained. You can practically hardly overdose it, which invites to shake the bottle properly.
The floral heart notes are for me only suspectable and from the musk in the base I notice nothing.
All in all, I find Wellington to be a fresh and cheerful summer fragrance without any aquatic impact. And that's something completely new these days!
1 Replies
7
Scent
7.5
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
10
Bottle
Tar

261 Reviews
Tar
Tar
   0  
Virile spices
At the first sniff I thought, Wellington Cologne is totally like Blenheim Bouquet (Penhaligon's), but I checked the date of creation, and I have to turn back the thought: Blenheim Bouquet (1902) is similar as Wellington Cologne (1876). Scents of old gentlemen.

Begins with a fresh citrus-eucalyptus whiff, but rosmary's bitterness takes over the domination soon. Gives what the creators promised: citrus sherbet with pine-needles". It does not change and lasts long.
For a man it may be relaxing on himself, for a women it is upsetting (smelling it on a man ;-) ).
I wear unscrupulously male fragrances, but I will stay away from this one, it is too much male even for me.

Perfume Classification by the Community


Photos by the Community

by Mörderbiene
by Mörderbiene
by Mikri
by Mikri

Popular Geo. F. Trumper

Astor (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Eucris (Eau de Toilette) by Geo. F. Trumper Curzon (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Sandalwood Cologne by Geo. F. Trumper Marlborough (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Spanish Leather (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Eucris (Eau de Parfum) by Geo. F. Trumper Wild Fern (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper West Indian Extract of Limes (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Havana by Geo. F. Trumper GFT by Geo. F. Trumper Sylvester / Silvester by Geo. F. Trumper Paisley Cologne by Geo. F. Trumper Ajaccio Violets by Geo. F. Trumper Lavender Water by Geo. F. Trumper Eau de Cologne by Geo. F. Trumper Eau de Portugal by Geo. F. Trumper Bay Rum by Geo. F. Trumper Skye (Eau de Toilette) by Geo. F. Trumper Milk of Flowers by Geo. F. Trumper