Wild Fern (1877)Cologne

Wild Fern (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper
Where to buy

Search on

More
Where to buy
7.8 / 10     22 RatingsRatingsRatings
Wild Fern (Cologne) is a popular perfume by Geo. F. Trumper for men and was released in 1877. The scent is green-fougère. It is still in production.

Search on

More

Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBasil, Bergamot, Lavender, Rosemary
Heart Notes Heart NotesFern, Carnation, Geranium
Base Notes Base NotesOakmoss, Musk, Patchouli

Ratings

Scent

7.8 (22 Ratings)

Longevity

5.8 (16 Ratings)

Sillage

5.2 (18 Ratings)

Bottle

6.2 (19 Ratings)
Submitted by Pazuzu, last update on 05.08.2020.
  • RateRate
  • CollectionCollection
  • SoukSouk
  • ClassifyClassify
  • NotesNotes

Reviews

7
Scent
5
Longevity
5
Sillage
Mörderbiene
Translated Show originalShow translation
Mörderbiene
Mörderbiene
Top Review    16  
English Toast vs Wild Toast
Trumpers Wild Fern and Penhaligon's English Fern suggest clear similarities due to their names, presentation and pyramid. These indications, as well as the fact that the user Yatagan emphasizes this similarity in comments on both fragrances, made me sit up and take notice. I appreciate English Fern very much, but the bottle is running out and the fragrance is no longer available from the manufacturer. So a replacement would be a good idea. Yatagan kindly sent me a sample from Wild Fern.
Trumpers Wild Fern starts deep green with a light spice. I probably wouldn't have come up with basil myself, but after a look at the pyramid it is more than plausible. This basil - there's not much more at the beginning - is soon underlaid by herbaceous, almost ethereally sharp, metallic lavender. So far, at least a similarity between the two cannot be denied. English Far from the competition also starts green, although without the slight spiciness of basil. In addition, the lavender that follows is less hot, rather mild and soapy. So far so good. After about two hours, Wild Fern reminds me quite profanely of burnt toast. I doubted my nose at first, but recently I had strange associations with other fragrances as well. Thus Neuffer's Hepster reminded me repeatedly of fish on the grill. Yes. Hm. Back to the toast.
I tried again and again, on paper, textile and skin, at different times of day and night, but the impression remained and remains the same. I smell my old familiar scents unchanged. It can't be because of my nose.
The toast jumps out, heavily blackened at the sides. You don't want to dispose of it right away, it's not that bad, and scrape off the black spots with the back of your knife. Now the black dust lies on and next to the breakfast plate, the toast still tastes burnt and you get angry black - not a good start to the day, not a nice association for a perfume.
This toast note, however, can only be perceived when radiated - i.e. at a distance of at least an arm's length - and at shorter distances it dissolves into the lavender and probably moss mentioned above. I can hardly explain this scent impression. Perhaps it is coumarin, which sometimes makes a breaded impression on me. Already with Issara from Dusita I thought I could smell the smell of brown bread. Floury, dry, a bit sour. There I attributed it to the combination of vetiver and needle resin. It remains a mystery to me, maybe someone can contribute something enlightening.
The Trumper will probably not be a substitute for the Penhaligon's because of this association, which I unfortunately cannot suppress. Let's see if Neuffer's fish from the grill still opens up to me.
16 Replies
9.5
Scent
7
Longevity
6
Sillage
9
Bottle
Smellscent
Translated Show originalShow translation
Smellscent
Smellscent
Helpful Review    6  
Green, green, green are all my fragrances (or: it depends on the content)
Fougèred fragrances (french fern) is a topic that always interests me, Yatagan's statement about the Amouage Bracken Man and his reference to the blueprint characteristics of Geo F. Trumpers Wild Fern made me really curious and drove me to a (usually unusual for me) blind purchase and lo and behold: it was really worth it!!

As is often the case with me, I don't test perfumes on their own but let them compete against a competitor. This has the advantage that the scent of the test candidates can also be better verified. As a competitor this time I have chosen Amouage Bracken Man, which comes from a similar fragrance family and is very important to me.

In contrast to the Amouage Bracken Man, Wild Fern is now "really" green from the beginning to its (fortunately not so soon) end.

I find Amouage Bracken to be spicy-green, with the emphasis on spicy, hence probably the - compared to Wild Fern - long shelf life and large sillage.

In the mind's eye of the Wild Fern user, lush green undergrowth appears in late spring or early summer ... bees buzz, the wind rustles in the leaves, frogs croak, mosquitoes buzz ... Huh, so what now? Should Wild Fern now perhaps serve as an anti-mosquito spray in the ferny undergrowth due to its initially suspected repellent effect? Well, these initial fears are fortunately soon dispelled and Wild Fern develops in a pleasant direction, a slight floralness resonates pleasantly in the background to the green base note. The individual components are very well balanced and coordinated, resulting in a green-light floral-earthy woody fragrance that is indeed reminiscent of a walk in the wild ferny undergrowth.

I can't really see musk and patchouli now ... The whole development is modest, but maybe that's exactly what makes Wild Fern so attractive: a certain straightforwardness, which reminds of English purism.

In the drydown, the two test candidates are then adjusted, whereby the Bracken Man now shows his green mark more clearly
Wild Fern is a simple and unspectacular masculine fragrance, in my opinion perfectly suited for everyday life and "taking the steam out" and can contribute to a relaxed atmosphere. What I appreciate in him is his extremely low sillage, so that he does not whitewash the character of the wearer and therefore leaves him his individuality.

The bottle in the modest green cardboard box is minimalist in comparison to the Bracken Man... Somehow sympathetic... that somehow explains the price level of the so-called "niche fragrances", as the Bracken Man is
The slogan printed on the green packaging:

"Can you imagine an English country lane in springtime, sunlight breaking through fresh leaves, wild flowers on the verge dancing in the morning breeze and, in the shade, fronds of new green fern?"

is indeed very well suited to describe Geo F. Trumper Wild Fern Cologne in a few words in an expressive way.

Conclusion:
Despite his 143 years of age Wild Fern is by no means oldschool and is able to impress. I like him very much and therefore he gets the same rating from me as Amouage Bracken Man. About the price/performance ratio of the two, you probably don't need to say too many words...
2 Replies
9
Scent
5
Longevity
5
Sillage
NotAmused
Translated Show originalShow translation
NotAmused
NotAmused
Top Review    12  
Solution of the riddle
1877 - In Hamburg, Hermann Blohm and Ernst Voss found a shipyard on the Elbe island of Kuhwärder (today Kuhwerder) with a rather *rausper* restrained occupancy rate. Asaph Hall discovers the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos, Tchaikovsky's ballet Swan Lake is premiered at the Bolshoi Theatre, and Trumper's Barbershop produces two new colognes in the UK capital under Queen Victoria. Marlborough and Wild Fern. The latter shall be governed by this Article.
Of course I put the test to the test in connection with the test of this classic. Out into the garden, behind at the water under the big alders and birches, there he grows: wild fern. It has a very special quality, which is probably the reason why it never appears in perfumes, even if they are called something with "fern". He doesn't smell. If you rub it between your hands, it smells like cut grass. But even that only briefly and weakly. When I crouched now there, with my fern, at the brook, under the trees, and a slight anger came over me, the solution to the riddle suddenly crept into my nose. Wild Fern does not smell of fern, but of the place where it grows. Herbs, represented by the clearly emerging rosemary and lavender of the top note, which begins with a little spiciness, but quickly becomes round and pleasant. The coolness of the shadow under the large trees is given by the subtle floral notes, the cracked bark is clearly represented by the tree moss and the earth by the patchouli.
This together results in a wonderfully drawn picture of a shady spot at the edge of the forest, which passes by much too fast according to the usual length of time spent there.
But luckily you can extend this Cologne in contrast to the rest in the countryside simply by replenishing
4 Replies

Perfume Classification by the Community


Popular Geo. F. Trumper

Astor (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Eucris (Eau de Toilette) by Geo. F. Trumper Wellington (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Marlborough (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Curzon (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Spanish Leather (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Sandalwood Cologne by Geo. F. Trumper Eucris (Eau de Parfum) by Geo. F. Trumper West Indian Extract of Limes (Cologne) by Geo. F. Trumper Sylvester / Silvester by Geo. F. Trumper Paisley Cologne by Geo. F. Trumper GFT by Geo. F. Trumper Ajaccio Violets by Geo. F. Trumper Lavender Water by Geo. F. Trumper Eau de Cologne by Geo. F. Trumper Bay Rum by Geo. F. Trumper Skye (Eau de Toilette) by Geo. F. Trumper Eau de Portugal by Geo. F. Trumper Milk of Flowers by Geo. F. Trumper Eau de Quinine by Geo. F. Trumper