Djedi 1926

Djedi by Guerlain
Bottle Design Guerlain
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9.1 / 1036 Ratings
Djedi is a popular perfume by Guerlain for women and was released in 1926. The scent is animal-leathery. Projection and longevity are above-average. The production was apparently discontinued.
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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesAldehydesAldehydes
Lily of the valleyLily of the valley
BergamotBergamot
Heart Notes Heart NotesJasmineJasmine
RoseRose
IrisIris
VetiverVetiver
Animalic notesAnimalic notes
Base Notes Base NotesAmberAmber
MossMoss
MuskMusk

Ratings

Scent

9.136 Ratings

Longevity

9.527 Ratings

Sillage

8.724 Ratings

Bottle

9.357 Ratings
Submitted by Kankuro, last update on 02.09.2021.

Interesting Facts

The name "Djedi" was based on an ancient Egyptian magician who reputedly was able to bring back the dead to life. Djedi has been sold up until the 1950s. However, it never was part of Guerlain's classic range. To celebrate its 70th anniversary, a true copy of the original 60ml model was issued as a limited edition in 1996.
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Reviews

10
Scent
6
Longevity
6
Sillage
9
Bottle
8
Pricing
SirPerfume

3 Reviews
SirPerfume
SirPerfume
   3  
Alpha and Omega
Djedi, oh Djedi...
You are the traveller, the trail and final destination aswell. Such tridimensionality!
One can be at the beginning and the ending.
Alpha and Omega.
Don't be afraid, child hearted. Enter the temple. Temple of seen and unseen.
The play of lights and shadows it is unreal.
Lay down and feel the heat and coldness...dusty but breezy too.
Don't fool yourself. Always loyal and truly.

Expect the unexpected.

P.S: some little big details;
Bottle from ~1936 or arround that
125ml version
Baccarat Crystal.
9
Scent
9
Longevity
8
Sillage
10
Bottle
Yatagan
Translated Show originalShow translation
Yatagan
Yatagan
Top Review    50  
Of magicians, pharaohs and raising the dead: an excursion into the literary contexts of antiquity with a special focus on a fragrance spell and the golden twenties
Djedi or Dedi was, as can be read in the above information, a fictitious ancient Egyptian magician who is said to have performed a special miracle at the court of King Cheops. He was said to be able to bring the dead back to life and to have knowledge of a mysterious sanctuary, which King Cheops had been searching for a long time. The king's immoral proposal to behead a criminal and then bring him back to life was rejected by Djedi in indignation. Instead, he performs the requested miracle on a goose and a bull. After the sorcerer also prophesies to the pharaoh in a prophecy that he himself would not rule for much longer, but that three of his sons would follow him on the throne, he rewards Djedi by letting him live in a son's palace. Interesting from today's perspective is above all the fact that Djedi brusquely rejects the death of a human being, even if he is a convicted criminal, and instead shows his magic power on animals. Raising the dead was not a very rare literary motif in antiquity, one only has to think of Eurydice, who is temporarily brought from the realm of the dead by her husband Orpheus. Especially touching are also the motifs of the raising of Lazarus (Jn 11) or the twelve-year-old daughter of Jairus (Mark 5 and synoptist Mt 9, Lk 8) by Jesus. But while the resurrected people in the New Testament are testimonies of Jesus' power over death, thus pointing to his own resurrection and giving comfort to the faithful, the magic of Djedi serves rather as a moral test. While the pharaoh is willing to sacrifice a person for the experiment without hesitation, the morally honest Djedi rejects this request.

It remains to be seen whether the buyers of the fragrance in the golden 1920s knew anything about this dazzling literary figure, but it was not uncommon for fragrances to be (also) named after well-known real or fictional characters, cultural and historical fashions or contemporary historical events (Ossian, En Avion, Mitsouko, Shalimar, Liu, Vol de Nuit...). In this respect the name could indicate a contemporary interest in Egyptology, because in 1922 the tomb of Tutankhamun was discovered by Howard Carter - and the Valley of the Kings or the Pyramid of Khufu still fascinate us today.

The scent itself is a legend: Time and again it is named as a reference, described as a particularly outstanding Guerlain fragrance, and the preceding, readable comments are in line with this. Interestingly, it seems to me that they were all published in 2011, when apparently a few drops of the fantastic magic juice were circulating in the forum or distributed at a perfume meeting. Now, before the decade is over, it seemed worthwhile to look at the fragrance in a new way and describe it.
Certainly it was more readily available at the time, as it was re-launched in 1996 on the occasion of Guerlain's 70th anniversary and was therefore only 15 years old. I have now also succeeded in finding a millilitre of a vintage bottle, which also has an excellent quality. Whether it is the original version or rather the 1996 version is not that important to me, because the Guerlain replicas are usually of excellent quality - and deliberately close to the original, so that both versions should be quite similar. By the way, in my opinion, the re-release shows the status Guerlain gives to his 1926 creation, because fragrances without any special historical significance would hardly be considered for a new edition in this house.

First of all, I want to state that, from my point of view, the fragrance clearly contains the Guerlinade (which can be found in pure form in Guerlain's "180 Ans de Créations", for example), even if not all commentators saw it that way. This characteristic, soft, somewhat animalistic and only minimally floral, rather balsamic note (tonka, vanilla, musk, amber, various flowers) is underpinned here by a smoky vetiver accent and a leather note in the classic sense à la Knize Ten or Bel Ami (excursus for younger generations: such leather notes have nothing to do with the synthetic leather from Tuscan Leather & Co.) The animal notes are never obtrusive, but very soft and warm. Cibet and ambergris shine golden. The heart note also reminds me a bit of Vol de Nuit, although in Vol de Nuit, galbanum, which is missing here, becomes permeated with time. Djedi also has nothing to do with the more distinctive and vanilla-laden Guerlain fragrances such as Shalimar and Habit Rouge or the angular, herbaceous, lavender-toned Jicky or Mouchoir de Monsieur. Typical of many older Guerlain fragrances is their dense, harmonious-complex formula in the heart and base notes, which makes it very difficult to identify individual flowers. What is interesting, however, is that, like many fragrances of the time, Djedi was composed around a chypre framework (bergamot, rose, jasmine, moss), but without any great impact. The edges and corners of many chypre scents are missing here, even if one could perhaps pass Djedi off as a leather chypre (a category of its own, mind you). Despite the legends surrounding the scent, Djedi is still so rare that it does not appear in the relevant genealogies of Haarmann & Reimer and thus no source for the historical relationship with other leather scents can be proven. Nevertheless, I agree with those commentators* who emphasize the leather note of this perfume. It is soft, almost creamy, dark, interspersed with green accents, slightly animalistically roughened; the vetiver note is more pronounced on the skin than on fragrance stripes or textiles. In the heart, the note of clay is also particularly strong, which is part of the guerlinade. A vanilla note is possible, but not certain. Oak moss appears in the base.

Why such a fragrance is no longer produced today is certainly easy to answer. Of course, it contains (at least in the original version) real civet (fortunately, today it is generally banned for ethical reasons), and a proper blob of oakmoss was never allowed to be missing in those days, but today it is banned by IFRA. One may also suspect that musk contains real deer musk (which is also forbidden or frowned upon almost everywhere in Europe today for good reasons of animal ethics).

Why was the fragrance so fascinating to me that I rated it with 9.5 points? At some point I noticed that the fragrance dates back to 1926, the year my father was born and the height of the golden twenties. The idea of being able to learn something about the attitude towards life of that time and culture through a fragrance interested me. In the process, I discovered the euphoric comments below and the obviously special status of the fragrance.
Why did I not give the fragrance the highest score? The fragrance is a monument and a symbol for the mentality of its time, the special epoch of the Roaring & Swinging Twenties, but for contemporaries almost more difficult to wear than Jicky, Mouchoir de Monsieur, Vol de Nuit or Shalimar; all of these are fragrances I love and which work (even) better for me as a document of the times because, in my opinion, they are still easy to wear today.
37 Replies
9
Scent
7.5
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
7.5
Bottle
DemonHead

18 Reviews
DemonHead
DemonHead
Very helpful Review    5  
Guerlain Djedi: a brief history and review
Egyptology must have been to the 1920's that which features like Harry Potter and Twilight are to us today. Howard Carter's monumental discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb in 1923 directly influenced the global psyche; much in the same way as teenage vampires have penetrated our cultural consciousness in 2013. But whilst we in the here and now must suffer the commerce surrounding pasty-skinned blood-suckers and battling werewolves, our great-grandparents actually drew breath during an age of colossal cultural, anthropological and historical value. Oh, how I envy them!

The magic and mystique of ancient Egyptian dynasties certainly served as the inspiration behind Guerlain's Djedi: a captivating and rare chypre oriental perfume created in 1926, just three years after Carter's significant find. Djedi was presented in a flacon designed the sculptor Georges Chevalier and produced by Baccarat in 60ml, 125ml and 250ml sizes. The contours of the bottle (with its tall, ridged sides and gently tapering rectangular ground glass stopper) is distinctly Art Deco in style; but also suggests the form of a golden sarcophagus with its lid being raised.
Djedi was marketed in this flacon until the end of the 1950's, and also for a short time in an exceedingly rare quadrilobe presentation. It was re-issued in 1996 in celebration if its 70th year as a limited run of 1000 numbered Baccarat bottles created from the original 1920's 60ml mould.

Before I go on to review this scent, first a little background: the name Djedi is derived from references found in the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead where the Djed is described as a pillar which was raised to maintain universal stability, balance and continuity. It is the invisible cosmic axis or "world tree" around which everything revolves... it separates the earth from the sky; and matter from spirit. The Djedi are the ancients attributed to spreading this awareness... often referred to or portrayed as formidable primeval magicians. Djedi are mentioned in historical tales of Egypt as possessing tremendous mystical powers; their shamanistic practices, still an enigma.
I feel this information important to mention as it translates directly to the perfume itself. Until Djedi's launch in 1926, Guerlain have perhaps never before nor ever since created a perfume which so precisely and faithfully depicts an age of esoteric antiquity.

Djedi the perfume is less luminous than other Guerlain offerings. It serves as a period piece honouring the ancient past... perhaps a past as archaic as the pyramids themselves. Whilst a very complex perfume, Djedi is somehow as basic and primordial as dirt and stone - the basic building blocks of man. It is earthy, elemental and possesses a certain olfactory temperature - a feeling of dwindling warmth like that thrown out by the dying embers of a bonfire. It darts back and forth across the invisible boundary of light where amber warmth meets the cold black of night. Djedi isn't 'pretty' like her sisters; instead, she perhaps represents the disfigured sibling who spends her life residing in the gloom. Something is "off". Sinister. Agonizing.

Djedi is composed using a very dry vetiver: one that furnishes the perfume with a parched, arid vibe. Combined with a measure of civet, patchouli, oakmoss and musk, this vetiver lends a dank, musty quality that evokes sensations of being deep underground; where narrow stone corridors trap the air that has not shifted over the millennia. There is a sense of being unable to catch ones breath. A commanding leather facet also brings with it a feeling of antiquity - I immediately imagine dusty animal skins stitched together to fashion a tattered ceremonial shroud. I feel as if I am witnessing the ghosts assemble at an ancient entombment; the atmosphere palpable with a sense of grief, sorrow and despair.

My nose struggles to reach for the rose and jasmine said to reside at the heart of Djedi, but Im sure they are there. Perhaps, as this olfactory requiem unfolds, my senses too have become impervious to the beauty that surrounds us all during a time of lamentation. Whilst I cannot pinpoint these individual notes, I do recognise what this resolute floral facet brings to the fabric of this perfume, and that is a contemplative moment to look back on an age of immeasurable glory and resplendence. I suspect it was Jacques Guerlain's wish to create Djedi so the world could recognise the rise and fall of one of the world's most powerful and beautiful ancient empires.

Djedi - being one of the rarest and most difficult to source of all Guerlain fragrances - threatens to be lost again to the sands of time. One might hope that the Djed is raised again, linking the material world with the esoteric one, and our prayers of resurrection are answered.
1 Replies

Perfume Classification by the Community


Photos by the Community

1996 re-issue (60ml pure parfum)
by DemonHead
80ml vintage pure parfum (ca. 1940s)
by DemonHead
by Coriolon
by Coriolon
the elusive egyptian god
by MrFumejunkie
by Chanelle
by Chanelle
by Chanelle
by Chanelle
125ml version of og. 1926 (bottle from 1936) Baccarat Crystal
by SirPerfume
by Coriolon
by Coriolon
by Coriolon
by Coriolon
by Merlina
by Merlina

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