Jicky Eau de Parfum

Jicky (Eau de Parfum) by Guerlain
Bottle Design Gabriel Guerlain
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8.2 / 10     526 RatingsRatingsRatings
Jicky (Eau de Parfum) is a popular perfume by Guerlain for women. The release year is unknown. The scent is spicy-animal. It is being marketed by LVMH. Pronunciation
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Perfumer

Aimé Guerlain

Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBergamot, Mandarin orange, Rosemary, Lemon
Heart Notes Heart NotesBasil, Orris root, Jasmine, Lavender, Patchouli, Rose, Vetiver
Base Notes Base NotesAmbergris, Benzoin, Spices, Leather, Rosewood, Sandalwood, Tonka bean, Vanilla, Frankincense, Civet

Ratings

Scent

8.2 (526 Ratings)

Longevity

7.7 (367 Ratings)

Sillage

6.7 (346 Ratings)

Bottle

8.5 (329 Ratings)
Submitted by Feylamia, last update on 19.10.2020.

Interesting Facts

Jicky is one of the first modern perfumes and the oldest one to be produced without interruption. Jicky´s revolutionary style back then when it was new, imitated - in contrast to previous perfumes - no natural fragrance. Instead, synthetic materials such as coumarin and vanillin (allegedly used for the first time) are used centrally and independently valid as fragrance building blocks.
For Marketing, Guerlain used a love story. “Jicky” is purported to be the name of a woman who Aimé Guerlain knew in England. On the other hand, it is said the name would go back to the nickname of his nephew Jacques Guerlain.

Variant of the fragrance concentration

This is a variant of the perfume Jicky (Extrait) by Guerlain, which differs in concentration.
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Reviews

8.5
Scent
9
Longevity
8
Sillage
9
Bottle
MonsieurTest
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MonsieurTest
MonsieurTest
Helpful Review    22  
Jicky is tricky. Try to learn to appreciate & love a classic
Reading educates. Reading about perfume - here as in books - enriches the store of knowledge, increases the ability to distinguish and ultimately probably also the sensual pleasure. Reading stimulates the senses. Or why and for what do you browse around here?
However, the proliferation of books also poses new problems for some people, such as swelling and even overflowing perfume collections. Or the arrival of classics that have been so often sung about and classified as historical milestones that the perfume lover now wants to know, own and, if possible, appreciate or even love them. Sometimes this happens very quickly, and as if by magic - but sometimes it requires a little patience and practice.

If you get older or if you are always interested in old things, this increases the attraction of fragrances that have been used for 50, 100 or even 150 years in all kinds of historical settings and have influenced your 20 sqm and contacts for 8 hours. A splash of Eau de Cologne Imperiale and off you go on a fantasy journey with the Guerlain carriage to the Paris of 1853. A splash of Jicky and you think back to the Paris of 1889, the Eiffel tower has just been built up and the masses marvel at the novelties of the world exhibition. Among other things, the first perfume to boast synthetic vanilla: Jicky. 80 years later, it is said to have been the signature scent of the classic James Bond mime, Sean Connery. And what guy wouldn't want to slip into his skin occasionally for a few hours?

BUT: One splash of Jicky - and we have a problem! Next to and in front of the guerlain-like, elegant blend of vanilla and lavender of finely blended traces of rose and iris, amber, vetiver and other spices and woods, the notorious animal scent of the civet cat throngs. Even if long ago synthetically imitated, it is still there. It stays on and off for a few hours, every now and then, and makes the whole thing interesting and appealing, but for Mr. Test just appealing in the sense of irritating: repulsive and only slightly attractive.

Now one could say: Well, then stay away from Jicky, wear Vol de Nuit and Heure Bleue and Chant d'aromes (all of which have similar distinguished old-fashioned Guerlain tidbits like Jicky) and of course the men's fragrances from the Champs Elysées 68, which are closer to the gentlemen's fragrances for messieurs anyway. But Jicky already lives here, and Mr. Teste occasionally wants to go back to the 1889 World's Fair. What to do? the Guerlainist now asks himself. We want to carry Jicky, but we want to defuse it somehow. May the ?

Wine or whisky?
Mr. Teste would never spray a Burgundy or Sauvignon blanc, a Rioja or Riesling with water or even with coke (as it is said by rich Russians, who are supposed to make the finest Bordeaux on the Cote d'Azur so palatable and disgrace the newly rich). And yet he allows himself - as the connoisseurs' rules also provide for - to stretch his whisky with water, his port wine occasionally as well and the latter, in summer, sometimes on tonic. Jicky seems to me in its density and power more like a whisky than a wine. Therefore, one may probably have the same difficulties and manners with its civet as with the sharp peaty aromas of an Islay Single Malt?

Experiments: careful, smallest possible Sptitzer from the beehive flacon of the Jicky EdPs. Maybe instead of the usual back of the hand on more distant parts of the body? But Mr. Teste feels strange, if he should suddenly, for Jicky's sake, scent his knees or crotch to keep the cat at a distance from the irritable nose.

So we try light counterweights. For this we will probably layer most simply with scents that already contain lavender and/or vanilla. For the time travel cinema you could use Atkinson's English Lavender (goes back 50 years with the Guerlain carriage) or Caron's Pour un homme (50 years forward into the 20th century) or Puig's light Agua Lavanda (Sinatra's favourite scent from the 1940s). Yes, but: as a Sinatra Connery son with the heavy jicky and the light and fresh lavender water, that not only gives you great cinema in historical terms, but is also good for the nose. Next Monsieur wants to try it with vanilla scents. And then also with citric colognes. Because in the Jickys-head notes, there are bergamots and lemons and tangerines, only with me you are quickly fetched by the cat...

One thing is clear: if the fragrance didn't undoubtedly have a wonderful drydown, lasted for a long time, radiated Guerlainian elegance, then you could simply leave it alone, leave it to the ladies, put it in a museum and keep your distance. But I think: Jicky is worth the effort and you should continue to wear this treasure from 1889, even if in different ways. The Guerlain house itself has remixed its Habit Rouge (citric top note in EdT somewhat pungent and dominant), which is bulky in other respects, in a quite formidable way, for example with the softer and smoother Habit Rouge L'eau and Habit Rouge EdP and probably also with the Habit Rouge dress codes which are hard to get. So please don't stone me, dear Jicky admirers, if you are thinking about and trying to do something like this here.

Now, on a more prosaic note, the sillage of the EdP seems strong to me, though less massive than that of Shalimar. The durability as well. The flacon is the beautifully ornate, now widely used glass beehive of Guerlain's women's classics; only the light plastic cap is a little disillusioning, which somewhat hampers the friction-free immersion into the age of carriages and trains.

Who can carry Jicky where?
Unisex is already checked off by the guaranteed identity of Mr. Teste and his key witness Sean Connery. For women, however, this fragrance is of course also wearable and perhaps more obvious. For all of them, however, Jicky seems to fit less into the office (except maybe for the Christmas party with ulterior motives) and more into the evening. It can be used all year round except in midsummer. Not in the sauna or for sports with it! The animalistic touch gives the whole thing an erotic touch, which of course doesn't seem to come across as directly as with Jicky's daughter Shalimar, who saw the light of day in Paris a generation later.

But maybe all this is also a question of skin chemistry and nasal idiosyncrasies and Jicky seems different to others in this respect?
Because one thing is clear: this classic consists of many layers and is knitted quite finely. You will notice that when you read the many other excellent comments here.
13 Replies
9.5
Scent
7
Longevity
7
Sillage
8
Bottle
Sniffsniff
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Sniffsniff
Sniffsniff
Top Review    17  
An attempt at homage..
Jicky and I are sitting together on a fallen tree on a small beach in the Flensburg outer fjord and let the first tentative rays of the March sun shine on the winter- and rain-weary fur. Today I have almost nothing on my agenda and so I take the time to finally realize the plan that I have been carrying around with me for weeks: I would like to try to write a comment that does justice to this outstanding fragrance.
After I had the chance to test some Guerlains and as a result of that I got closer to this traditional brand, I always got stuck with Jicky. That name. Somehow playful, almost cheeky. Who is this Jicky and how he/she might smell. A bottling was quickly ordered and so I dared to try this fragrance, about which so much has already been said, without any expectations. I simply wanted to know what he/she smells like, this fragrance that already caused a sensation at the end of the 19th century and still inspires people today. My test was accompanied by a small pinch of fear that a great tangy surge of musty flowery sweetness might strike me. But no, nothing like that happened. Jicky is Goethe's Mignon, that androgynous, ethereal being who asks me if I know it, the land where the lemons bloom. Jicky is not female, not male, Jicky is Jicky. Citric in tone, which immediately undergoes a slightly oriental twist and is carried by dark woody intensity. A touch of sweetness balances the virgin notes and makes them not only bearable but also enjoyable. Jicky always stays fresh and never drifts into the stuffness I hate and fear. Incense joins in and gives the fragrance a mysterious and darkly sparkling depth. The individual notes interweave ever deeper and finer, transforming the freshness into a warmth that gently ensnares me, which seems to have fallen out of time, neither young nor old, but absolutely out of time.
And now I know I've known Jicky for a long time. Jicky smells like Aunt Trutchen. Aunt Trutchen, the good soul of my childhood. Aunt turkey wasn't my auntie. She was my neighbour. Born in 1912. And no other name could have been worse for this grande dame than Turkey. Trutchen was the wife of a Hamburg forwarding agent and had travelled far. At the end of the seventies they bought our neighbouring house on the edge of the forest and from then on spent their retirement weekends in a rural idyll. Trutchen was about 1.55m tall, very slim until old age and never wore trousers. She always welcomed me (between my 5th and 10th year we spent almost every afternoon together) in a knee-length pencil skirt, wore a noble blouse and dainty pumps (at the age of 9 I was proud as Bolle, because now I could try high heels for the first time - I had grown into her shoe size 35). She wore her chestnut brown hair chin-length, curled with side parting from ear height and placed it so accurately in a water wave as I only knew it from black and white movie beauties. Of course Trutchen was made up, when she sat on her expensive upholstered chair with her legs crossed and waited for me. That's what real ladies do. And she would never have worn pantyhose. For heaven's sake. Trutchen wore silk stockings and suspenders. Of course she did. When Trutchen and her husband were living in their Hamburg-Altona apartment, I got bored. I, precocious only child, simply lacked the sophisticated element in my boring school life (even if I couldn't call it that at the time). Even my kind grandmother could not change that, no matter how hard she tried. Grandma did not serve me Earl Grey made of Chinese porcelain cups at 4 pm. Grandma wore pants. Granny also did not tell me about Odessa in the early 50s and wild parties in Rijeka. What a sound. Pure exoticism. How I would love to talk to Trutchen about more adult topics today. I'm sure I would have blushed in shame every now and then. Trutchen's husband was what is commonly known as a real philanderer. I noticed that already as a child. When he took me to the tennis court, he was always surrounded by a handsome swarm of much younger ladies in no time at all and played the cock with devotion. Trutchen didn't care about that, she will never have been short of admirers.
When I was in my early 20s, my mother called me and told me that Trutchen had died at 94. She was sitting peacefully in her upholstered armchair, with a pencil skirt and her legs crossed The more often I wear Jicky, the more certain I am that this very scent was her signature scent. I know him, he's more familiar to me than anyone. Jicky is turkey. And today, at 37, Jicky is me too
7 Replies
Fortezza
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Fortezza
Fortezza
Top Review    2  
It is a courageous wine with a hint of refinement and a lack of ambition - I think it works better ... You can taste the currant right away
Just as Meg Ryan in "French Kiss" only discovered the scents of the wine in the second attempt, so I was also with Jicky from Guerlain.
I admit. I was worried whether the first perfume, "établi avec" synthetic fragrances, and not only from the previous century, no millennium could somehow meet me in the 21st century. And LAVENDEL, according to the fragrance description as a heart note in excess. I don't know, I don't know, I don't know. When I stroll from my garage entrance into the garden and let my hand touch the lavender bushes ... Then the evening is probably not far away and I do not have to drive scorpions away with it.
The perfume is, well, not affordable for everyone. Unless you're more loaded? Regular guest at the Salzburg Festival. That's why I was content with the eau de parfum. After several attempts I found the right day And then.
Wow! You can smell the bergamot and the lemon immediately. The lavender is covered with jasmine and vanilla to leave room for the ambergris, incense and civet cat after some time. The oriental notes become dominant with the length of the evening. Behind sinful veils glow black-edged deer eyes, which carry the embers of the sunset in themselves. A souk in Casablanca, a secluded courtyard in the house of a Sheik? Full of bougainville, orchids, spice and the scent of an opulent Lebanese dinner ?
Rarely has a fragrance touched me so, so unexpectedly.
Actually, I wanted to give the scent of my sweets to Valentine's Day. Well. Unexpected often comes.
I'm gonna keep it and look for a bouquet of flowers....
And besides: the plastic cap does not meet the requirements of the bottle anyway
8
Scent
8
Longevity
7
Sillage
8
Bottle
Oak
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Oak
Oak
   10  
Timeless classic
For me there are not many scents in nature that calm me, let me come down or relax. The queen of these rare fragrances is lavender. I love lavender, as a scented bag in the cupboard, as tea, hung up to dry in the kitchen.... in our garden we have about 40 plants and 12 different varieties. Clearly I must have this old and familiar scent of Guerlain.

The scent sample and I arrived home at the same time. There was no time for foreplay, the jacket was torn from the body, it hasn't touched the ground yet and I already sprayed the delicious Lavendelmana over me....and, yes and.... i wondered... where's the lavender now?
No lavender, only citrus fresh and a subtle fragrance that could remind you of lavender with a lot of imagination. For calming down we had lavender tea.

Next day, new trial.
It started the same way as the evening before had ended.
At the beginning there is a nice pinch of citrus freshness, after a while the citrus becomes less and actually the lavender is added, also the vanilla is perceptible and all this beautifully packaged in a spicy accompanying note. Leather, incense and vetiver I take was not very superficial.

I don't smell anything animalistic to myself, rather a little powdery but discreet. An absolutely harmonious and round, gentle fragrance that invites you to linger or just relax if you want to.
It is quite wearable by men, even if I don't necessarily see it in the middle of the 20's.
I think it is also good for the job (office, sales, field service), because it is not so intensive from the Sillage.
He's got a place in my closet.

Thank you for your time!

4 Replies
10
Scent
8
Longevity
16paws
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16paws
16paws
Top Review    29  
Damn long ago, damn long ..
In 1889 the Jicky Extrait came on the market and in this time also the EdP might have originated. Awesome! A fragrance from the 19th century that is still produced today without interruption. At that time, in 1889, Kaiser Wilhelm II sat on the throne in Germany, Bismarck was Chancellor of the Reich and Charlie Chaplin was born. In May of that year, the Eiffel Tower, designed by Gustave Eiffel (1832-1923) and named after him, was inaugurated at the Paris World Exhibition. A year in which a lot more happened, but would go beyond the scope here.

129 years have passed since then and I find the question of whether such an old perfume is still wearable today more than justified. Yes it is portable here too and today in 2018 and it is amazingly modern. No fog and muff of the imperial era, no old camel and also suitable for women and men in the "here and now". Jicky is a very individual fragrance that has nothing in common with today's mainstream fragrances. Nevertheless, or maybe just because of that, it is beautiful, at least for me.

The beginning is lemony violent, stabbing almost. Then it becomes green and herbaceous with a hint of lavender. I don't smell rosemary or basil, only lavender, which I actually don't like at all, at least not in a higher dosage.

It takes quite a while for Jicky to get smoother, softer. It never becomes lovely. Jasmine and Rose, which are listed, I can not recognize. I notice a hint of powder and vanilla, smoky, unsweet, beautiful, dark vanilla.

Later leather is added, soft, old and somehow spicy leather. Frankincense penetrates only weakly, almost discreetly to me and the woods are warm and soft and remind me strangely way of beaded parquet.

I don't see the cat that many have quoted and feared. I don't perceive any animal component, which is actually a pity. Is it the reformulation? I can't say it and it doesn't diminish my enthusiasm in any way.

I had tested Mitsouko and L'Heure Bleue before Jicky and it was quite difficult for me to find access to these scents. With Jicky it was completely different, because of all things the oldest fragrance inspired me right away. There were no abandoned tests, no weighing, no plumbing. Jicky touched me from the first moment on and touched me deeply and in the end it reminds me a little of Shalimar.

Jicky is unusual, extraordinary and beautiful to kneel down. Aimé Guerlain has created a fragrance for eternity! At least I hope so, because it would be a tragedy if this perfume simply disappeared and was withheld from our descendants.

13 Replies
7.5
Scent
6
Longevity
7
Sillage
6
Bottle
Thatsmr2usir

62 Reviews
Thatsmr2usir
Thatsmr2usir
   1  
Vintage Parfum De Toilete
This is for the vintage Parfum De Toilette

Jicky is mostly lavender, vanilla, spices with a almost gourmand gingerbread vibe to it. I must admit I am not a fan of lavender fragrances, but it is done right here with this particular fume & the notes added alongside it blends in so well it is very good.

That lovely civet kicks in & gives it that one, two PUNCH! I just love NATURAL civet in fragrances, it adds such a dirty, sexy vibe to the composition. This was created & marketed for women but it can EASILY pass for unisex or even a men's frag.

This beauty last on my 5-6 hours, & projects nicely for the first couple of hours & the rest leaves alot to be desired.
I expected greater longevity from this one but it just is not happening. Tho the Parfum De Toilette is what EDP's are today, The notes here are more natural & less synthetic which is always good.

I'd certainly make this a signature scent doing the fall as it reeks, class, beauty & sophistication with the right amount of sex! A classic & underrated beauty for sure!
8
Scent
7.5
Longevity
5
Sillage
7.5
Bottle
Cumulnimbus

77 Reviews
Cumulnimbus
Cumulnimbus
   1  
Casual sophisticated comfort
Jicky is a comfort perfume for me, one you can always go to when you need to recover the joy of being under your own skin in an effortless still charming complex way. I love to wear it in spring daytime with a polished casual outfit, white shirt, jeans, leather sandals and minimal jewelry. Perfect for a active sunday morning, reading on a cafe's terrace under the sun. Try it out if you are not afraid of vintage unisex perfumes with a bit of leather and hidden dirt under a perfectly polite sweet lavender cream. Sillage and longevity are both moderate in the contemporary edp version.
GypsyJohn

4 Reviews
GypsyJohn
GypsyJohn
Very helpful Review    9  
Strong Enough for a Man...but made for a woman
*FIFTY SHADES OF GUERLAIN
*
#2) Jicky
(1889, Aimè Guerlain)
-golden forest brown-

Modern (c. 2012) extrait review

I have reviewed hundreds of fragrances and own in excess of a thousand; yet, no other scent has confounded me as much while managing to enrapture me so completely. Please bear with me as I attempt to translate something so utterly iconic and sublime as Jicky using only the written word...

I felt as if I was looking down the wrong end of the proverbial microscope, attempting to review and experience such a legendary and revered perfume as Jicky having only a decanted sample of the most recent extract version (read: "post-IFRA's most stringent guidelines and more than a decade after the LVMH takeover") with which to plumb the depths of Aimè Guerlain's late 19th century masterpiece. Yes, I know, that word gets bandied about a bit; yet if any scent ever deserved that appellation-it's Jicky, even this almost holographic representation is no less amazing and still has its Guerlain glimmer!

To put this perfume in an historical perspective, it was released right in the middle of the Belle Èpoque era (1871-1914) in Europe, corresponding to the Gilded Age in the US. The Eiffel Tower was unveiled (many scorned it calling it gauche and unsightly). Van Gogh painted "Starry Night". The Moulin Rouge was open for business and Gustav Mahler premiered his first symphony. Baudelaire, Gaugin, Matisse, Bernard, Toulouse-Lautrec and a very young Picasso frequented Paris nightlife and salons. Pierre-François had passed away twenty-five years earlier leaving the Guerlain legacy to his two sons: Aimè becoming a second generation Master Perfumer and Gabriel *father of Jacques* running and expanding the business. The Age of the Machine was dawning and as exciting as that was, folks were a little skeptical of anything "un-natural".

Guerlain was a pioneer and Jicky broke many a mold. It is touted as the first "emotive" perfume (not single note or place specific). This fragrance was not the first to use synthetics (Houbigant used coumarin in Fougère Royale 6 years earlier) but Aimè was the first perfumer daring enough to combine more than one synthetic (coumarin, ethyl-vanillin and linalool) into a blend of natural essences; thus its title of first "modern" perfume. Allegedly, it is also the first fragrance to be called "perfume", as opposed to eau de cologne I would imagine(?). He crafted Fleurs d'Italie (1884), Skine (1885) and Rococo (1887) beforehand and Excellence (1890), Belle-France (1892) and his dual swan songs of Capricime alongside his generational ode to cologne Eau de Cologne du Coq in 1894 afterwards; however Jicky is, in my humble opinion, his magnum opus.

Without intending to (or perhaps he DID) M. Guerlain conceived and created a very androgynous unisex perfume. Supposedly, this was released for women, but was later adopted by men, ultimately being favored by both genders. One myth states prostitutes wore it because it left a very masculine trace and trail (not the more feminine scents usually worn by courtesans) lingering on their (presumably married) clients.

Then, just as now, many people fear what they do not understand...and Jicky remains perplexing on many levels. It was not initially received well (many said it "smelled like feet!" in 1889) and I am sure the *still* visionary fusion of a classic fougère structure being adorned with sophisticated flowers dusted with a subtle mélange of oriental notes then drenched by an overdose of civet musk left many inquisitive sniffers with wrinkled noses; no doubt shaking their heads and reaching for their snuff tins.

Many call this perfume "schizophrenic". I disagree wholeheartedly. There must be a "schism" (break) for that to be true and Jicky is anything but fractured or confused. The reaction of modern people has been a bit insane; as I have gotten the STRANGEST range of comments while wearing Jicky for the last few days (trying to wrap both my nose and brain around it). Everything from "you smell awe-some!" to (Sherapop's aforementioned) "spice cake" accord to my partner's declaration that one of the most majestic fragrances ever created reeked of "offal...with burnt hair on top"! Moral of the story: TRY BEFORE YOU BUY...because Jicky doesn't come cheap! *see links below*

An immediate vaporous warmth surrounded me as a lemon-dominated blend of citruses add lift to gradually unfurling herbal accords and the aroma of savory spices. Its true fougère nature is apparent as velvet lavender opens in the heart giving this a classic appeal with rustic undertones. The inviting charm of the opening draws you, like a bouncing and bright will-o-the-wisp, guiding you into a half-lit forest dense with fertile soil, cool greens and heady blooms wafting through humid air tinged with muskiness. A beguiling creature appears from the underbrush, each and every movement graceful while gliding between the trunks. It continues prancing and laughing with a blend of innocent joy and mature wisdom though each and every gesture belies an intimate sensuality and deep connection to the Earth.

This being radiates a masculine strength and rural ruggedness; yet, its obvious gentleness and feminine grace enchants, even as it confounds. Aimè Guerlain used varying degrees of green (orris, linalool and vetiver) to blend seemingly incongruous notes ultimately bridging the gap between "his" (fougère) and "hers" (floriental) with perfumed tendrils who pull the scent together as it expands and evolves.

An exotic balminess remains languorously for hours on skin. Coumarin's sweet breath lingers over vanilla glazed and spice-impregnated wood. Jicky purrs quietly as it caresses you one last time, emitting a (for want of a better term) "fresh funk" that haunts the memory with its beauty, almost as much as its oddness, before fading away into the wee hours a cold frosty night.

Projection on modern Jicky extrait varies greatly, depending on whether it's dabbed or sprayed, and on where it's applied. The longevity (especially on clothing, detectable even days later) is superlative. Sillage is soft, yet it can reappear-stretching and baring its claws a bit-when skin warms. It wore best for me on a drizzly and chill autumn day. Jicky is the perfect scent for such occasions as it has a definite ambience and moody complexity.

Silage: moderate then soft
Longevity: above average
Overall: 5/5
*TIMELESS AND ETERNAL*
Jicky is like the groovy great grandmother perfume surrounded now by her various fresh, oriental and fruity floral progeny. She is still amazing, warm and full of life. Unfortunately, she is not what she once was. Though very much alive she tires quickly and doesn't do quite as much as she used to do. Her very matronly aura commands respect though she is anything but formal, quick to hug with a joke and a smile. Always comfortable with herself and who and what she was, perhaps it is best we choose to remember her how she was in her heyday, full of sass and a total knockout while still being grateful we have her around today. She's still that lady (and always will be) who remembers (though she may claim that she doesn't) sylvan moonlight soirées and dancing barefoot in clothes that smelled of earth, love, smoke and flowers wandering home at dawn; now smiling and humming as she taps her nimble feet and gazes with ancient eyes at a full golden midsummer moon.

Love her or hate her, then or now, Jicky deserves the title of Legend
10
Scent
7.5
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
10
Bottle
MasterLi

375 Reviews
MasterLi
MasterLi
Helpful Review    9  
Review for the Eau de Parfum...
Reviewing something like Jicky isn't an easy task... but I'll try and give it a go.

Simply put, if you don't know much about fragrance, Jicky is basically the ancestor of practically every modern perfume we have today. Although it was not the first perfume to use synthetic notes (as opposed to those inspired by nature), it was different in that it was based on an abstract concept. Emotion (this was a perfume inspired by a person, and memories associated with them). All perfumes before either related to a place or a natural ingredient (a bouquet of flowers,a single flower, eau de cologne etc.). Fougère Royale by Houbigant was released 6 years before Jicky and used a synthetic note: Coumarin (an Almond and Hay-like note derived from Tonka Beans). However this was just a single synthetic note. Here, Aimé Guerlain used not just Coumarin, but also Linalool (a Minty, spicy-fresh type note), and Ethyl-Vanillin (a Vanilla derivative). The result? The foundation for all modern perfume. The world's first truly abstract (i.e. "Modern") perfume.

So what does this 125 year old creation smell like? Well, it doesn't smell simple. It's complex, and not old either. Jicky is essentially a Lavender-Vanilla combination, but not just that. It's also dirty and warm, due to use of Civet (an animalic, Musky note), which gives it a very intimate and a very human, almost sexual feel in the background. For me I get 4 main notes: bitter Bergamot, sweet Lavender, a dry and almost nutty, sweet Hay note (from the Coumarin/Tonka Bean), and warm, dirty civet (animal musk). It's such a strange mix but really fascinating to wear. I basically get sweet Hay and dry Lavender, with a hint of bitter-sharp Lemon and Bergamot, before settling down to a deep, sensual Vanilla and warm Musk combination which stays until the end.

Even after all these years... Jicky is still a very hard one to describe. But it's certainly a direct ancestor of all Lavender-Vanilla combinations since (including Pour un Homme de Caron and even Jean-Paul Gaultier's Le Male). It's also the direct predecessor of Shalimar (Jacques Guerlain later added a huge dose of Vanilla to Jicky and created Shalimar).

The other question: is it for men or for women? Originally it was a unisex/masculine scent. But very few men wore something as complex as Jicky, and afterwards was embraced by women (not at first, because of the skanky, animal-like Musk note). But time has proven that Jicky is truly androgynous, as it belongs to the fougère family of fragrances directed towards men (the herbs & lavender "barbershop" feel), but at the same time was dirty and sensual and sweet with a Vanilla and Amber base, and was later adopted by modern, independent women. The list of people who wore this includes Sean Connery and Roger Moore, but also Brigitte Bardot and Jackie Kennedy. It really doesn't have a gender. Even the name "Jicky" was either a nickname for an English girl whom Aimé Guerlain loved (called Jacqueline) or his nephew, Jacques Guerlain (who would later create Shalimar).

Basically, there is no other way to say this but that Jicky is a work of art and the DNA ancestor of all modern perfume. Without this, there wouldn't be a Shalimar, or a Chanel No. 5, or any other "abstract" type of perfume which uses rich, sensual ingredients and which is not inspired purely by nature.

My advice? Try it, not just because of the history and significance... but also because you may be surprised and challenged. It's not for everyone, and it's a little strange to many people, but if you approach it with an open mind, you may really grow to like or even fall in love with it. Jicky is as French as the Eiffel Tower, and like an impressionist painting... is to be appreciated as art and with respect in order to understand where modern perfume-making came from.
2 Replies
6
Scent
7.5
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
Sherapop

1239 Reviews
Sherapop
Sherapop
Helpful Review    6  
Is spice cake naughty?
I was very late to the Guerlain JICKY party, having acquired my bottle only a couple of years ago. I had never sniffed it anywhere, so upon delivery of the package, which I had ordered from an online emporium, I experienced my very first spritz of this legendary nineteenth-century creation--or so I thought. Naturally I was shocked at the disparity between the qualities of this reformulation, whose naughtiness is exhausted by the letters BHT appearing prominently as the fourth named ingredient on the box, and the reputation which preceded "JICKY".

Spice cake is the take-away, basically, to my nose. Okay, so it's spice cake being served in a barber shop, but it's spice cake all the same! I have nothing against spice cake, mind you, but clearly there is no civet cat or reasonable facsimile within a thousand miles of this reformulation.

To be more precise: Batch OT01 of the eau de toilette, which comes in the 3.1 ounce refill bottle--perfect for inserting into my now empty gold MITSOUKO case--is a kind of light refreshment, quite suitable as a rejuvenating cologne. To me this composition is unisex leaning slightly toward the masculine side. All that I need to go along with it are a hot towel and some cream cheese icing.
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Statements

Carlitos01Carlitos01 9 months ago
8.5
Scent
8
Longevity
7
Sillage
7
Bottle
A timeless fougére with a bit of civet. It's quite complex but the end result is preety conservative. I like it very much.
TruckladyTrucklady 17 months ago
10
Scent
8
Longevity
8
Sillage
10
Bottle
In Gone With The Wind, Scarlett O'Hara splashed, and gargled, EDT, whereas Rhett smoothed his hair with Jicky.
LillibetLillibet 3 years ago
8
Scent
6
Longevity
6
Sillage
8
Bottle
Mine is the modern 'bee bottle' EdP. Herbal open, powder & a gentle growl beneath. The dry down smells amazing right up close to my skin.

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