English Oak & Hazelnut 2017

English Oak & Hazelnut by Jo Malone
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7.8 / 10 150 Ratings
English Oak & Hazelnut is a popular perfume by Jo Malone for women and men and was released in 2017. The scent is woody-fresh. It is being marketed by Estēe Lauder Companies. Pronunciation
Goes well with English Oak & Redcurrant
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Fragrance Notes

Green hazelnut Elemi resinElemi resin VetiverVetiver MossMoss Roasted oakRoasted oak CedarwoodCedarwood

Perfumer

Ratings
Scent
7.8150 Ratings
Longevity
7.3128 Ratings
Sillage
6.6129 Ratings
Bottle
7.8120 Ratings
Value for money
7.040 Ratings
Submitted by OPomone, last update on 23.09.2022.
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Reviews

2 in-depth fragrance descriptions
8
Bottle
7
Sillage
8
Longevity
8
Scent
Pinkdawn
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Pinkdawn
Pinkdawn
Very helpful Review 14  
Brother tree?
He loves autumn walks in the forest, cold air, smoke ... With these preferences, Yann Vasnier seems almost predestined to create a modern autumn fragrance.

Jo Malone's "English Oak & Hazelnut" was brought to me by my penchant for good, natural wood notes. I found the idea of creating a fragrance from English oak and hazelnuts fascinating.

The reviews also made me curious. Wood, but with green - I found that exciting and new. The fact that some people rather associate the fragrance with a British landed gentry in the tweet and consider it masculine, I naturally suppressed.

The olfactory experience of oak and hazelnuts was important to me. Whereby it should be green hazelnuts. That sounded interesting. How do green hazelnuts and English oaks smell? I tried to remember. The old hazelnut bush in my grandmother's garden in Hamburg. When I was there in summer, the hazelnuts were not yet ripe, but you could already see them clearly. Fresh and light green they grew on the branches and seemed to get bigger every day. But I never sniffed them.

With the oak tree I thought of walks and encounters with venerable, old oak trees that were so old that one went or walked there especially to see them. Then one sat down next to or under them, tried to feel their energy, perhaps make contact with the tree soul, which was unimaginably old for us, and imagine what this tree had not already experienced. These were often awe-inspiring moments. Of course I had never noticed a special oak scent. Only the usual earthy freshness that these trees radiate. But Yann Vasnier, with his trained nose, probably smelled out more.

In the course of my research on EOH, I learned that it is not supposed to be fresh but roasted oak wood. Hm. Does that mean that oaks have to die for this scent, or are we content with joinery waste or cut branches?

Whatever. Perfume is always an illusion until you know it. Scent takes you back to reality. To iris, gentian, lavender, jasmine, roses and many other plants, which have to lose their lives in the extraction of a natural scented oil, as well as various farm animals for our diet, if it is not vegan.

As for the roasted oak wood, it is in any case obtained from wood chips that are washed and then roasted at high temperatures, I read. This procedure is supposed to produce a rich, smoky-sweet aroma.

EOH had been on my wish list for some time when an opportunity arose to buy a small bottle at the souk. Autumn was just around the corner - what to wait for?
On the one hand, I had some illusionary ideas about the fragrance, but on the other hand I had no concrete expectations. Did EOH meet my expectations?

According to the scent pyramid, the fragrance begins with green hazelnuts. The heart note is mainly aromatic cedar wood. Only later, in the base, does the proud oak appear.

The fragrance starts green and woody. That's not much of a surprise to me. Rather the almost alcoholic-hot freshness, which becomes noticeable here. The green notes announce themselves with a restrained, natural sweetness.

At first, the scent is refreshing, but for me it is still a distinct autumn scent that reflects what you get to sniff during an autumnal walk on the countryside on a blue-sky day at the end of October. What is it? Wood mainly. The star is the oak.

Wood as the main part in a fragrance is quite rare. Mostly wood notes are found in the base, at best in the heart note. But here the wood scent is present from the very beginning - spicy, tart, natural and elegant. It is refined that fresh green notes accompany it. This makes it a rather light, cheerful and yet elegant autumn scent that no one need fear. Anyone who associates autumn with earthy patchouli and mystical smoke fog will not get their money's worth. Everything here is sunny and extremely easy going. I suspect that there is Elemi in play, known as the "light-bringing" resin. It contains woodsy-citric elements and - really only - a touch of incense
The oak or its toasted chips create the illusion of an impressive, large tree still in its leaves.

The freshness gradually acquires something soft, almost creamy, but never gourmand. Instead, I think there are nuances that remind me of vetiver and earthy mosses.
I could imagine that Iso-E-Super is also involved a little bit. Because the fragrance lives a little on contradictions. That makes it varied and exciting. For example, I couldn't decide now whether the fragrance is soft, warm and cuddly or rather cool. That changes. We're also dealing with a perfume that's modern and classic at the same time, cosmopolitan and down-to-earth.

In terms of structure, the fragrance is similar to oak: the course is clearly linear after a relatively short top note. For me, this is also the strength of EOH. It is an aromatic, very natural-looking, light, dry wood scent with accents of forest and moss. It seems to have nothing chemical, "perfumed". A fragrance like a handshake, honest, confidence-inspiring, mature and cultivated. It contains only a few perceptible notes, but these suggest high-quality ingredients, which gives it an impressive simplicity. Its solid durability and silage also speak for its excellent quality. At this price, of course, a matter of course.

Those who want to can sniff out wilderness and adventure. I'm thinking more of tweed, British gentry, solidity and understatement. That may not be exactly my world. I would have liked more depth, something like nature magic, a tiny little secret perhaps, a fragrance that matches the wonderful landscape descriptions of the barren, late autumn moors and heaths in J. R. Tolkien's work. That's it. But here I encounter more of a jovial, red-cheeked country squire on horseback, riding his extensive land holdings with ease.

So that's what happens when a Frenchman creates a fragrance for an Englishman with the English oak at its centre. Is that actually different from the German, Austrian or French ?

EOH is a good fragrance with innovative, original features. And I find it interesting that an autumn scent manages to be for once not earthy and misty. On the other hand, we are, at least I am, strongly influenced by the mystical autumn clichés. It impresses me that they don't exist here, but I admit: I miss them a bit too. I will certainly love to wear this fragrance, but I won't buy it again because it is too masculine, simple and straightforward for me. I'm sure there are women for whom this spicy, tart scent suits them well. I'm thinking of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall. But I'm a very different kind of woman...
9 Replies
7
Bottle
6
Sillage
5
Longevity
7
Scent
loewenherz
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loewenherz
loewenherz
Top Review 24  
The wild swans
One of my favourite fairy tales (as it is one of the most lyrical and dramatic) - the motif of which exists in slightly altered form in many variations throughout the world - is that of the only sister of many brothers who are transformed into birds by a curse - and only that sister can free them from this curse only by doing a work that is as difficult as it is long. In the version of the Brothers Grimm - the most popular in this country besides that of Hans Christian Andersen - an evil queen transforms the sons from her husband's first marriage into swans. The curse can only be broken when her youngest sister makes a shirt for each of them out of starflowers (in Andersen's case, nettles), while she is not allowed to speak. In the end the swans will save her sister from being burned at the stake - and because she was not quite finished, the youngest of them will keep a swan's wing on her back.

The fairy tale of the princess and her brothers enchanted in wild swans takes place over long distances in dark forests - whether Germany, Denmark or England, it is almost indifferent - where the princess searches at the foot of tall trees for those star flowers from which she has to knot the swan shirts. They are impenetrable and untouched, dark forests - but neither dark nor eerie. While reading I always imagined her walking barefoot and in light-coloured clothes torn by thorns over sun-drenched moss, a basket with the precious load in her arms. How she sits in the pale moonlight in the fork of an ancient oak tree, working the delicate stems of the flowers into a fabric - full of concentration and calm, but without sadness or bitterness. And the scent of this silent work - the echoes of the forests of the north, the enchanted swans and the shirts of starflowers I find in Jo Malone's English Oak & Hazelnut.

His name leads us a little bit on the wrong track, because he doesn't have hazelnut in the sense of 'Nutella' - even if the 'green hazelnut' mentioned in his ingredients already tells us that. Instead, there is a hint of honey or beeswax - and fine roasted aromas like wood cracked in the sun, which then darken and ripen, as it were - in a maximum medium intensity typical of Jo Malone. There is the moss warm from the sun, the tiny white starflowers, the rustling oak leaves in the wind - is perhaps even the beating of swan feathers over a distant sea. Despite the cedar and its inherent southern flavor, English Oak & Hazelnut is not a Mediterranean scent, but lacks macchia and pine resin. Instead light summer woods. Wild strawberries. Golden moss and dry fir cones
Conclusion: Nordic mystical summer woodland. Without Nutella. Instead with enchanted swan princes and shirts made of starflowers.
4 Replies

Statements

3 short views on the fragrance
BlkbrdBlkbrd 2 years ago
It does have that nutshell treebark bitterness, in a well-mannered estatey way. Light brown/green/grey. Their oak note is an achievement.
0 Replies
PBullFriendPBullFriend 3 years ago
8
Sillage
6
Longevity
5.5
Scent
Hazelnut note is interesting but rests atop a bog-standard men's cologne designed to offend no one. Felt like I was about to grow a beard.
0 Replies
Jazzy76Jazzy76 5 years ago
8
Bottle
7
Sillage
8
Longevity
7
Scent
It's a very particular fragrance with a strange acchord: green but with a roasty touch given by the oak at the base.
Too high the price
0 Replies

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