Original Eau de Cologne by Johann Maria Farina gegenüber dem Jülichs-Platz
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7.9 / 10136 Ratings
Original Eau de Cologne is a popular perfume by Johann Maria Farina gegenüber dem Jülichs-Platz for women and men and was released in 1709. The scent is fresh-citrusy. It is still available to purchase.
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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBergamotBergamot LemonLemon
Heart Notes Heart NotesGalbanumGalbanum JasmineJasmine VioletViolet
Base Notes Base NotesSandalwoodSandalwood CedarwoodCedarwood FrankincenseFrankincense MuskMusk

Ratings

Scent

7.9136 Ratings

Longevity

5.5119 Ratings

Sillage

5.1120 Ratings

Bottle

6.8114 Ratings

Value for money

7.318 Ratings
Submitted by Kankuro, last update on 27.08.2022.

Interesting Facts

This fragrance by Farina Gegenüber is the first and original EdC from 1709.
"Original Eau de Cologne" goes back to a special mixture, the 1709 "Aqua Mirabilis”. Johann Maria Farina, an Italian immigrant to Cologne stood behind the original recipe. Soon there were other "Eau de Colognes", that used the name "Farina” and Farina had to fight against plagiarism. With Georg Mühlens, who issued one of these 1792, there was a long-running dispute. Eventually the product´s name was changed in "4711 - Eau de Cologne". Until today, both companies produce their fragrances. Farina Gegenüber states to use the old original recipe from over 300 years ago.
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Reviews

2 in-depth fragrance descriptions
3
Sillage
5
Longevity
7
Scent
FvSpee
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FvSpee
FvSpee
Top Review    25  
Colonia instead of Corona, No. 14: Offside
In football, it would be unfair and boring if a player from the attacking team were to line up directly at the opponent's goal and then his team-mates would simply pass the ball over the heads of both teams, so that the ball receiver would not have to do anything except accept the ball and then coo into the goal at the closest possible distance. This seems to me to be a sensible approach, even though I assume that this would not be so terribly easy for the "goal scorer" either. But after all, you want to see how the game builds up slowly and the ball is played forward step by step.

This is why there is the offside rule, which states that a player of the attacking team is forbidden to pass the ball to a team-mate if that team-mate is standing "directly in front of the opposing goal", defined in such a way that there must be at least two men from the defending team between the "accepting man" and the opposing goal (usually the goalkeeper and a field player). If this prohibition is violated, i.e. the ball is played, and at that moment the "target" is directly in front of the opponent's goal, he stands offside and the whistle is blown offside accordingly, which is then less good for the attacking team.

Supposedly, nobody who is not a football fan understands this rule. It used to be said that women did not understand this rule, but anyone who would say something like that today would also be on the sidelines. I'm not a football enthusiast, but I think I understood the rule so well that I could even explain it. Or?

On the other hand, although I'm an olfactory enthusiast, it's completely impossible for me to tell the story of the relationship between "4711" and this Cologne by Farina Gegenüber. Somehow the two argue about whose cologne is the real one, which one was there first, which one is from the real Farina, who this Farina was in the first place (it has nothing to do with Farin Urlaub) etc etc. This is all too confusing for me. Especially since there is also a "Farina" cologne from Roget&Gallet. To include this in the explanation would probably be like the offside rule in three-dimensional chess played in Star Trek.

Nor can I report to what extent the "Farina Gegenüber" (I bought my bottling in the souk) available today is still identical with the versions from 1709, 1809, 1909 and 2009. I think, however, that galbanum, sandalwood and (white) musk were not part of the standard repertoire of perfumers and colognes in 1709, and that incense was more likely to have been used in church at that time.

First of all, I find that "Opposite" from 4711 is about as different as an apple from a jack. So we don't have to think that the difference is like between Czech "Budweiser" and American "Bud", between "Coke" and "Pepsi" or between "Jenaer Glas" from Jena and "Schott Glas" from Mainz. This scent must be described independently.

It begins with a light, fine, very bright, citric (rather lemony) opening, to which perhaps a little orange, but only a little bergamot and rather no neroli seems to have been added. However, this citrusy note is - untypical for a cologne - not very dominant. From the first second on, a floral (also light) and, for my understanding, strongly synthetic heart note is present, whereby by "synthetic" I mean both classic aldehydes and these modern shower gel boosters. I don't like this so much, especially since it seems unexpectedly feminine, sweetish and chemically veiled to me. From minute 2 on, the base, which is surprisingly woody for a cologne, starts to show through. Here you perceive the typical pencil note of cedar, not overwhelmingly strong, but still stronger than incense. Beyond the pencil it is rather a fat mossy soaked and therefore fluffy generic light general wood.

All in all, this is Farina's anti-4711. 4711 is uncompromisingly old-fashioned, but Farina seems to me to be rather strained modern. I perceive it as a very bright, dry wood-musk-aldehyde-if-not-ambroxane flowering plant with a lemon facade glued in front of it. That was perhaps very hard now, but I had to give vent to my disappointment (I had expected something fulminantly classical here).

The projection is very weak, but the durability - at least up close - is suspiciously long (over four hours).

Although of course all comments here are great, for further reading I especially recommend the one by Nase1 (who feels the scent similar to me) and the one by the always highly appreciated Ttfortwo (as counter-program to my comment): She is enthusiastic and gives 10 points, but nevertheless we are despriptive in many ways not so far away. Whether her sample from the 90s smells the same as my current one, I don't know, of course.

I still give 7 points, but I'm whistling offside.
24 Replies
Nase1
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Nase1
Nase1
   7  
Never and never THE original Kölnischwasser!
Somewhat disappointed, I must say, I am from the cologne of the company Farina. It advertises to be the original or to use the formulation from 1709. This can't be happening. Although the fragrance starts off very beautifully citric and bergamot, a pleasant mandarin is also added, but then comes a synthetic, artificial tone, which is currently used in many modern perfumes. I can't identify it exactly, but in Chanel pour homme Sport it is the main component. The many advertisements from Farina are of no use. I'm sorry, if you think you have to offer the original, then offer the original, but don't offer such a - with all due respect - tourist nep! It may be that this is a pleasing scent for other noses than mine, I do not want to deny that, only a scent from the 18th century is this certainly not. But of course I'm not an expert on baroque or rococo scents either, so please see my comment as a completely subjective, personal impression.

I deliberately do not take the widely known 4711 as my benchmark. Both are different, only the opening note is similar, although it is harsh and dry in Muelhens and slightly lighter in Farina. That's where the similarities end. But that's not what matters to me. If I should say which of the two I prefer, I would write: None. If I were forced to wear one, I would always prefer the granny water to the alleged original made in a modern way
11 Replies
Gabryel
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Gabryel
Gabryel
   6  
Definitely no auntie scent
During my last visit to Cologne I walked past the Farina store and spontaneously went in - after a rehearsal I had to take the scent with me. Has nothing to do with the 4711 auntie fragrance, is light and lively, spicy-floral-lemon and simply a force.
1 Reply
10
Bottle
2
Sillage
6
Longevity
10
Scent
Ttfortwo
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Ttfortwo
Ttfortwo
Top Review    28  
A gem. A little miracle.
While sorting and systematizing one of the back corners in my closet, I came across a geological layer from the 90s and several small unopened bottles of this fragrance.

It's almost a miracle: a recipe from the first years of the 18th century - the cathedral was far from finished - and this little hero still exists. What did he not have to survive, payment difficulties, aggressive imitators, rubble and ashes, Swiss exile, but he is still there and looks younger than ever.

What an enchanting, soft friendliness this fragrance radiates! He is so different from his saber-toothed, metallically radiant namesake. I'm wearing both, the 4711 variant on the left, in an older edition, of which I brought several small bottles from Cologne as souvenirs for me at the beginning of the 90s - so before I sold them to Wella/Mäurer and Wirtz.

Two of these 4711 bottles were still there and unopened - one I "decapitated" especially for this comparison. It is completely intact and therefore well suited for comparison, because its counterpart, the counterpart fragrance, was bought on the same occasion and is therefore the same age. The Farina fragrance had already inspired me at that time and I had taken one of these enchanting reclining bottles with me (it's long since gone, afraid of a long time, used up) and several miniatures.

Yeah, I have a soft spot for "survivors." That's why I have the greatest respect for the 4711-Cologne water. But I've never worn it because it's too harsh for me, too radiant-steel, too headache-fresh. In the course of time, the 4711 variant also becomes somewhat softer, fortunately loses this citrus needle tip, lavendered for some time and then almost disappeared.

The Farina fragrance, on the other hand, is - apart from a slightly alcoholic start - flowery from the start and its freshness is mild and fragrant and the fragrance lasts much longer. Now, at this point of the text, only a pale orange blossom hint is left of the 4711, while the Farina fragrance is still pleasingly present and complete.

The Farina fragrance is a light version of a perfume, 4711 a short refreshment in extra brut.

Farina's little miracle gets a 10 from me because he's so old, because he still exists, because he's really beautiful, and: A complete perfume
12 Replies
6
Bottle
5
Sillage
5
Longevity
8
Scent
Taurus1967

3 Reviews
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Taurus1967
Taurus1967
Top Review    14  
Sooo old - sooo fresh!?
Anyone who visits the fragrance museum in the Farina House in Cologne and is amazed at the history of perfume will receive a miniature of the original Eau de Colognes as a small gift.

If it hadn't been for this nice present, I probably wouldn't have taken this fragrance seriously. Although I found it fascinating how this Eau de Cologne was the first of its kind to be developed by Johann Maria Farina and later Napoleon was a big buyer (with which he supposedly dieselled everything in), the real surprise is the olfactory appearance. If the recipe has been on its way for more than 300 years, then, as Leimbacher already remarked, it was definitely far ahead of its time.

After all, it should still be the original recipe (uh... at the latest with the musk I would think rather that there some ingredients were substituted), after which this Cologne is further manufactured. And this one has it in itself, because here it sniffs pleasantly citrus-orange fresh. Actually very contemporary, as if OEdC was a brand new fragrance on the market. In contrast, its oldest and best-known competitor 4711 Echt Kölnisch Wasser has more of these concentrated bergamot and neroline notes and, despite its more complex design, appears somewhat more dusty in the figurative sense.

OEdC is more simple knitted, but precise on the point and seemingly totally timeless. I can hardly imagine that people used to smell the same way, but I can't prove the opposite now either.

That must have been quite exotic even back then, because lemons and oranges (which are not mentioned up here in the pyramid, but on Farina's side) were not as widespread as they are today.
After a relatively short time, the fragrance fades into a shallow woody softness.

Conclusion: Original recipe or not - what was produced naturally at that time will not be possible today without synthetic aids (I only say: musk). But everything is fresh and pleasant - as long as this is more important to you than the story behind it.
4 Replies

Statements

2 short views on the fragrance
MarabuntaMarabunta 2 years ago
8
Bottle
5
Sillage
7
Longevity
9
Scent
One of my all-time favorite colognes with an excellent lasting power and a touch of dead flowers and camomile along with the gorgeous citrus
0 Replies
KingPinKingPin 3 years ago
5
Scent
Fascinating that it’s been around for so long. Though I acknowledge the historical significance I personally find it a bit too spicy.
0 Replies

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