Timbuktu by L'Artisan Parfumeur
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Timbuktu is a popular perfume by L'Artisan Parfumeur for men and was released in 2004. The scent is spicy-woody. It is being marketed by Puig.

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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesPink pepper, Cardamom, Green mango
Heart Notes Heart NotesKaro-Karounde, Frankincense, Papyrus wood
Base Notes Base NotesBenzoin, Myrrh, Patchouli, Vetiver

Ratings

Scent

7.9 (476 Ratings)

Longevity

7.3 (349 Ratings)

Sillage

6.5 (341 Ratings)

Bottle

7.6 (321 Ratings)
Submitted by DonVanVliet, last update on 08.11.2019
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Reviews

10.0 6.0 8.0 9.5/10
Benedikt2019

0 Reviews
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Benedikt2019
Benedikt2019
Helpful Review    6
Oasis of the senses
For a long time I thought about how I would add a comment to this fragrance. The mere fact that I find it so difficult to establish a thematic reference pays Timbuktu a silent tribute. It is a scent with which I initially had my problems or to which I had no direct access. He kind of seemed "old" to me. That's the smell my grandpa wore - I thought to myself. Then autumn came and I thought I'd grab your rehearsal again. And wow, I was surprised, I suddenly heard an infinite depth, a pull into a hidden world, a journey to faraway lands and green oases. The idea of actually being in an oasis city (like Timbuktu is) is supported by incense and myrrh. These two scent components remain well dosed and make the scent oriental, but fortunately not smoky. Woods and vetivers as well as cardamom finally ensure that he gets his woody undertone and his smooth tones. For me, therefore, the fragrance can only be described in this trilogy: ORIENTAL_SPICY_WOODY!

Nor can I compare Timbuktu with any fragrance I have in my collection. I cannot renounce him and have worn him for several days in a row, which is really rare for me as I wear a different fragrance from my collection almost every day. It could become my new signature scent! I quickly realized that I finally had to buy it. And the beautiful, green and sublime bottle also goes perfectly with the fragrance and underlines its essence.

Timbuktu is also a true oasis in everyday life. I smell it and feel like on vacation, like in 1000 and one night, as if I was relieved of a moment of hectic and trouble and would lie under palm trees and watch the camels drinking. Moreover, it is a true feel-good scent. He makes it - just like Joop WOW! - to convey this feeling of security. One feels carried and enveloped.

Durability and Sillage are quite convincing with me. It lasts about 8-9 hours on my skin and the Sillage is perceptible about 3-4 hours on one arm length. Extra asked my sister to stop it :D

Nevertheless, this fragrance is truly not something for everyone! It may seem outdated to some and give the feeling that it should rather be worn by an older gentleman. So: test it at all costs! No blind buying! But if you are looking for a beautiful, dreamy and noble autumn scent, you might find it here.

P.S.: My mother only said about the scent, it smells like soap (well!)

Good evening,
Benedict

:)
4 Replies
8.0 7.0 7.0 9.0/10
Carlitos01

238 Reviews
Carlitos01
Carlitos01
Very helpful Review    7
A lively and fascinating scent from a lost world
I have been more than a couple of times in different regions of Africa - actually I was born in Africa. The entire continent is a journey of hot colors and warm scents.
A perfumer must be really sure about his work when such a powerful name like Timbuktu is used. One cannot avoid to recall sand coloured buildings and palaces, colorful fruits, a goat here and there, smiling people, some imposed vivid green, and the omnipresent desert wind scent.
Timbuktu - the fragrance - pierces your nostrils with an opening first moment of strong spices together with a tropical sweet fruit aroma. It's a hot perfume from the start. Later, spices become even enhanced with an exquisite peppery floral touch, along with the lingering scent of frankincense.
As time passes you feel a second strong moment of resins along with the incense seasoned by a fainting sweet vanilla and an "African" dry, woody and smoky green. This balsamic green endures all through the drydown.
The perfume is good enough for 6 to 7 hours of longevity depending on the formulation. Sillage is somewhat discrete but you will get your money's worth with a couple more sprays for a four~five feet scent radius with an hour and a half of projection.
It's hot, it's green, it's dry, it's smoky, it's balsamic, it's woody. It's Central Africa, or even North Bolivia.
I am testing the white label flask pictured here in Parfumo.

How does Timbuktu faces my ratings?
________________________________________________________________________________________________
Scent Opening:.........8,5 (fantastic)
Scent Drydown:........9.5 (close to perfection)
Longevity:..................7.0 (less than 7 hours in my skin)
Sillage:........................7.0 (4~5 feet sillage with 1.5 hours projection)
Uniqueness:..............9.5 (quite unique, evoquing some high standard vetiver fragrances, but different)
Wearability:...............9.0 (It's an all weather scent although a bit less appropriated in very cold days or nights)
Versatility:.................9.5 (all occasions except in the gym)
Compliments:...........7.0 (more a self pleaser than an attention grabber)
Quality:......................9.0 (above average quality ingredients)
Presentation:............8.0 (no comments)
Price:..........................7.5 (€45,00 - 50 ml EDT)
________________________________________________________________________________________________
Overall rating: 8,32/10.0
between 7 and 8 =above average;
between 8 and 9 = recommended;
bigger than 9 = don't miss it;
Opinion: One of the best exquisite scents and I like it very much. A vetiver gem.
Recommended? Yes, but only if you like the scent of strong woody & smoky vetiver.
Blind buy worthy? No! Do try it before you buy it.

Music: "Survival" by OSIBISA
1 Replies
9.0 7.0 7.0 8.5/10
Bloodxclat

0 Reviews
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Bloodxclat
Bloodxclat
Helpful Review    10
Caribbean Village Market
Basse Terre, Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles.
Around noon on the dusty market place, the sun burns mercilessly on the old spice seller, who fills the glasses with fresh cardamom and nutmeg on his old white wooden boards. The young woman behind him ties her Bwe Bandé carefully but firmly with a thin string. Didi, the man with the tequila fruit, grinds green mangoes. Drumbeats penetrate from the nearby cemetery - incense, resin and dry herbs are burned
1 Replies
9.0 7.0 8.0 10.0/10
Jazzbob

0 Reviews
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Jazzbob
Jazzbob
Greatly helpful Review    20
Timeless men's classic with a certain something
Making a connection between the name of a perfume and its fragrance is usually a good way to start a commentary. But Timbuktu should not come to most people's minds much more than that the city is somewhere in the middle of nowhere - more precisely, in Mali, on the edge of the Sahara. The source of inspiration for Bertrand Duchaufour's creation was the mixture of woods, roots, spices and resins, "Wusulan", which is widely used in West Africa as a perfume substitute in burnt form. This association may seem plausible to me, but when I smell Timbuktu, I think above all of the fact that Orient and Occident, nostalgia and modernity meet here.

Although the long-lasting foundation is formed by woody and balsamic notes, Timbuktu starts off fresh and ethereal - almost reminiscent of mint. I think that this impression is achieved by the cardamom and the initially cool incense. Furthermore, a slightly exotic side is created by the mango, which is fortunately used subtly and rather as an unripe fruit. How exactly Karo-Karounde should smell now, I don't know and there are different descriptions of them (warm, soft, fruity, sweet, indollic, animalistic), but Timbuktu has indeed a facet, which I can't classify exactly and could come from the African plant. For me, less frankincense than myrrh is also influential for the further course. In addition to the balsamic, this has a slightly sweet quality, which Duchaufour has added as well as the mango in discreet form. At warmer temperatures, however, I perceive both more strongly. These more modern notes are thwarted by a base of vetiver, patchouli and papyrus, which is thoroughly woody, slightly green, smoky and dry. From my point of view, all components form a perfect balance and are relatively closely interwoven. A really similar scent hasn't come under my nose yet.

That's why Timbuktu also falls into the timeless men's classic category for me. There are enough 80s retro hipster trash or unbalanced experiments in the niche market, but this creation doesn't seem too demanding despite the exotic notes and already a bit familiar in the drydown. Actually I would rather classify Timbuktu as an Ü35 fragrance, since he already has some maturity, but I have owned him myself for almost four years (I was 25 then) and he has fascinated me more and more while wearing. Despite a certain heaviness, Timbuktu is not only worn in the cold seasons. Even in summer it doesn't get too much for me and just, as already mentioned, changes more into the slightly fruity, balsamic direction. For me, there are very few perfumes that do not suffer from such changes due to very different temperatures. And while the oasis city, threatened by desertification, longs for it, Timbuktu ironically fits perfectly into rainy weather.
6 Replies
9.0 7.0 8.0 8.5/10
JoaoMartins

5 Reviews
JoaoMartins
JoaoMartins
5
One of Duchaufour's best
Incredible price for what you get here. Woody and smoky, super green but with this backbone of a dirty patchouli and vetiver that blends this greenness and makes it a great classy and elegant scent. The incense completes it, filling the whole spectrum of aromes in this juice. It's an interesting perfume, complex and intriguing. There's some kind of black magic in there.
It's not a perfume for beginners. Almost everyone that I know doesn't like it if you give them to smell directly. For me it's not a big deal. I like it and I love to wear it and people don't seem to be bothered about it. It's an unique scent, made by the god hands of B. Duchaufur. It's not a crowdpleaser and it won't give you compliments, although, for some reason there's quite a magical experience when I wear this one.
2 Replies
8.0 7.0 8.0 9.0/10
Konsalik

0 Reviews
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Konsalik
Konsalik
Greatly helpful Review    23
The green Orientale (now lives in Greece by the way)
Vetiver seems to be a strange plant, which can be almost arbitrarily shifted and varied in its expression, provided that it has the appropriate skill. Like grey oil paint that mixes with others, it combines, harmonizes and tints in pastel tones. On its own, however, like the isolated colour impression of "grey", vetiver is inaccessible, open to interpretation, difficult to decipher. At least that's how I perceived Vetiver in my latest review of "Encre Noire".

At least on my skin Timbuktu is a rather simple scent, but the tinted connecting movement of Vetiver makes its simple gesture elegant and round: The fresh, spicy, for me very subtle fruitiness of the opening (must be the peppered mango, but of its own accord I would not have thought of it) merges almost seamlessly into an incense that is kept nicely in check, which flattens all too easily all other scents for my senses. Here, however, despite all the dominant, balsamic creaminess, it retains a certain greenish shimmering freshness (influences me here the colour of the bottle, or was it designed following the greenish scent impression; it's a chicken-and-egg problem), which makes it three-dimensional - not like "Sancti", which seemed to me in comparison more like an incense paddle beaten against my head. Opened and loosened up in this way, incense becomes more associative: as if the oil lamps hanging from the ceiling were lit in the dark crypt of an Orthodox monastery: Timbuktu never gets really bright, but just enough light was added to it to be able to make out the glitter of the liturgical device in dim twilight as well as the shimmer of the iconostasis.

Bertrand Duchaufour seems to be one of the perfumers who want to trace a clear vision with their scents (see "Sartorial"). I don't associate much with Timbuktu, however, except stickers on packages of funny paperbacks when someone is "sent to the desert" again. An Orthodox liturgy, on the other hand, I have already visited and ask: Once you've been through the full four hours (incl. "Naturtönigem Mönchsgesang"), you'll have had similar impressions, independent of individual beliefs, as Duchaufour associates them with the term'Timbuktu': strange beauty, lived mysticism, golden shimmering clarity with simultaneous unattainable enchantment. Simple and discreet in all its splendour. A place of longing, but one where you can simply feel good. I'm sure I'll wear Timbuktu more often.
7 Replies
5.0 7.5 10.0/10
Fhaldara

54 Reviews
Fhaldara
Fhaldara
Very helpful Review    4
Magical!
I usually avoid spicy and resinous notes, they always seem overpowering on me. In this case, curiosity, good reviews and the urge to try something new led me to buy a sample of Timbuktu. I was half expecting something heavy and overly spicy, but this is an airy wisp of spices carried on an unfolding trail of incense that settles quietly onto old woods. I immediately ordered a full bottle, and I'm sure it will be used often - we're well into fall now, and this fragrance feels perfect for our cold New England winters.
ColinM

516 Reviews
ColinM
ColinM
Very helpful Review    5
Overrated woodie
The opening of Timbuktu is mostly centered on a sharp, almost austere vetiver-incense-cedar accord, dusty and dry, basically halfway the smell of slightly aged paper (something like In The Library by CB I Hate Perfumes) and the smell of “pure” wood – and by pure I mean the pale (and quite boring) smell of a woodchips warehouse. No trees and forests, just the smell of Ikea furniture out of the box. That, with a subtle salty-earthy vetiver note, something velvety and sweet (resins, I guess) and a light fruity-floral breeze with a gentle red pepper note. After a while the incense note gains a prominent position, a rarefied and thin balsamic-synthetic incense like in many CdG fragrances (Kyoto above all: quite the same synthetic woody-balsamic feel). That’s it. Really linear and quite plain, you may think it “hides” some complexity or something interesting is ‘round the corner, but... well, it doesn’t, it’s really just that. A synthetic incense-woody scent like dozens of others - not as “avantgarde” as the CdG’s, not as classy as stuff like Gucci pour Homme... Shortly: meh.

5,5-6/10
2 Replies
7.5 7.5 10.0/10
Insense

25 Reviews
Insense
Insense
Helpful Review    9
The origins of mankind
For me, this is my dream of the future: my place of desire, the mythic Timbuktu, where I want to be one day. Such is this amazing scent: quiet, spiritual, in peace and harmony with nature, and evocative of mankind origins.
2 Replies
2.5 10.0 10.0 6.0/10
Drseid

671 Reviews
Drseid
Drseid
Greatly helpful Review    8
A Fine Effort, But Not My Kind Of Thing...
Timbuktu opens with a bang. I get tons of frankincense and spice mixed with something dirty underpinning the notes which must be cardamom. The cardamom remains as does the incense, but the scent turns very soapy with some floral accents creating an interesting juxtaposition of dirty and clean. Vetiver joins the party late, adding some mildly smokey and earthy aspects to the scent in its later stages of development. Timbuktu is very unisex, and has great projection and longevity.

I am somewhat torn on Timbuktu... It really is a good scent and one of the best from the house of L'Artisan, but it really is not for me. Not a bad effort at all from one of the best noses on the face of the planet, Bertrand Duchaufour, just not good enough for me to recommend it without reservation. Still, Timbuktu is definitely sniff worthy and even FBW to those that enjoy similar scents. I'll give it a mild thumbs up and a rating of 3 stars out of 5.
1 Replies

Statements

Carlitos01 8 months ago
Incense, myrrh, vetiver and a floral note of gardenia to disconcert any nose. Adorably mysterious! Probably the best "Artisan" for me.+4
8.0
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7.0
9.0
JoaoMartins 14 months ago
There's a Jubilation XXV vibe in this one. Bertrand's hands do magic. Truly underrated!+3
9.0
7.0
8.0
8.5
Hermesh 3 years ago
Peppery dry incense with subtle fruity note. Exciting-modern and nice to wear at the same time. One of Duchaufour's best!+1
7.5
7.5
7.5
8.0
1 Reply
Hajuvana 4 years ago
Raw fruit pulp and incense+1

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