Mare Nostrum - Aura Maris 2012

Mare Nostrum - Aura Maris by Lorenzo Villoresi
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7.5 / 10174 Ratings
Mare Nostrum - Aura Maris is a perfume by Lorenzo Villoresi for women and men and was released in 2012. The scent is fresh-citrusy. It is still available to purchase.
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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBergamotBergamot
Mandarin orangeMandarin orange
Floral notesFloral notes
Fruity notesFruity notes
Heart Notes Heart NotesAromatic woodsAromatic woods
NarcissusNarcissus
PatchouliPatchouli
JasmineJasmine
Base Notes Base NotesAmberAmber
MuskMusk
Woody notesWoody notes

Ratings

Scent

7.5174 Ratings

Longevity

6.9125 Ratings

Sillage

5.8135 Ratings

Bottle

7.4116 Ratings

Value for money

7.710 Ratings
Submitted by Kankuro, last update on 05.09.2021.
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Reviews

7.5
Scent
7
Longevity
6
Sillage
NikEy
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NikEy
NikEy
Top Review    9  
The Man and the Sea #03 - Shore leave
The first shore leave of the journey is imminent. A small island in the Mediterranean Sea is the destination. Just big enough to be able to moor, nature welcomes us with its very own rough charm. Barren sandy soils provide a sparse growth of dry herbs, which give off their aroma to the fresh sea air. Only a few blossoms stretch out towards the sun and from the interior of the island a scent of the citrus plantations reaches us...

Mare Nostrum opens with a citric head. Sour and tart, I perceive lemon and bergamot above all. If you, like me, are irritated by the classification (citric-fresh) and the many tangerine evaluations, please let me know. Because immediately clear herbal spice and green-dry flowers complement the scent impression and take the main role for me. Less citric than woody-herbal, but still fresh, I would describe my scent impression.

Over time - and here it should be noted that the whole process tends to take place in the first thirty minutes - the citrus notes become weaker and the tart orientation takes over. Patchouli joins in and clearly creates a chypre character for me. I am a little surprised that nobody here has classified it in this direction. Without losing its freshness, it remains a spicy-herbal scent until the end.

That Mare Nostrum is not an aquat in the true sense of the word is already revealed by the scents. Instead of a chord that reflects salt or the sea, a landscape close to the sea has been created here. And with it scents in the style of a classic Italian colognes. Those who have added the more classical representatives of Acqua di Parma to their collection will certainly enjoy this interpretation as well.

For me the shore leave was nice to look at. Having briefly enjoyed the sophisticated and fragrant stature of the fragrance, I prefer to go back to the sea. Maybe in a few years I will return to this place with a trip, but for my current search and my age I find this fragrance rather unsuitable.

The durability is in a good range, the sillage is rather average but remains relatively long at a constant level.
___________________________________________
edit 2020: I suppose already today, 2 years later, I would like this fragrance much better and more wearable for me...
6 Replies
9
Scent
8
Longevity
5
Sillage
10
Bottle
MajorTom
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MajorTom
MajorTom
   6  
Ti amo, in sogno ti amo, in aria ti amo
...Umberto Tozzi once sang and speaks/sings from my soul, because I really love this fragrance. But one by one.

Mare Nostrum. A blind purchase. And yes, I was a little afraid because my last blind purchase (masculine pluriel) was still trying to get my full attention. Now a summer scent, although the summer is over and Villoresi's Uomo is currently used at least twice a week at respectively me. But the next summer will come and so it can't hurt as an alternative.

Mare Nostrum does not have an easy time of it, as there are several companies that vie for our attention and promise to conjure up the flair of the Apennine peninsula combined with all holiday memories in our Teutonic home. I think the blu mediterraneos from AdP are already doing quite well, and some representatives from profvmvm roma like ichnvsa or especially Acqua di Sale are also doing very well.

The prelude to Mare Nostrum gives me the feeling that someone is starting to peel a mandarin right under my nose. Heavy. A real bomb. Now it is the case that tangerine oil is one of the most expensive things you can imagine in the field of fragrances, so I was curious how much of it was used here. Apparently well dosed. After only 2-3 minutes the surge is "evaporated" and we come to the actual fragrance. The mandarin withdraws to a wonderfully balanced measure and the fragrance releases woody notes, which I find extremely successful. These woody echoes remain perceptible to the end and that is a good thing. In the dry down I sniff out some amber, which makes the whole story appear a bit rounder.

But where is the sea? I need a lot of imagination here to associate something. But maybe I'm too used to the salty component from Acqua di Sale and expected more of it here than I actually have. Towards the end light, but really only easily recognizable.

What remains is another nose flatterer, fruity, woody, fresh, aromatic and yes, bringing a piece of Italy across the Alps at the end of the day. Unisex, by the way.

Scent: top, exactly my thing.
Shelf life: after 8 hours still da
Sillage: rather disappointing, maybe I have to diesel myself with it?
Flacon: Hexagon-style, I like it super, pleasantly different.

And so I close with 883's Grazie Mille:

Per ogni giorno, ogni istante, ogni attimo,
che sto vivendo, grazie mille,
signore Villoresi!
valandria

30 Reviews
valandria
valandria
   5  
Not what I was hoping for...
I do love my beachy scents, but Aura Maris was a big let down for me. True, it is not sweet. It is a burst of citrus, with wood and more wood. I don't pick up any other fruits other than the citrus. I got looking at the notes and then smelling it on my skin, which led me to get out my bottle of Eau sOleil by Parfums de Nicolai. The two are very similar in structure, but I much prefer Eau sOleil (much brighter and complex) over the Aura Maris. There is something kind of flat about Aura Maris to my nose. I had high hopes for this one, but on me it just fizzled out.
1 Replies
8
Scent
1
Longevity
5
Sillage
5
Bottle
Gold

470 Reviews
Gold
Gold
Very helpful Review    5  
Make me a perfume that smells like the sea!
"Mare Nostrum" is an exquisite scent which seems to be born of Villoresi's passion for perfume coupled with his gorgeous imagination. This fragrance feels very natural and avoids all things sweet, sugar and fruity. Instead, there is a play between a citrus burst with mandarin and lemon and a mysterious woody chord which feels like a soft breeze from the sea. No calone used here in order to evoke the acquatic atmosphere, the whole things remains transparent and soft. The scent trails off beautifully, with musk and woody notes. And it's long-lasting.
1 Replies

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