Aoud Lemon Mint (2016)

Aoud Lemon Mint by Mancera
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Aoud Lemon Mint is a popular perfume by Mancera for women and men and was released in 2016. The scent is citrusy-fresh. The longevity is above-average. It is still in production.

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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesLemon, Coriander, Pepper, Almond, Mandarin
Heart Notes Heart NotesEgyptian jasmine, Patchouli, Oud
Base Notes Base NotesLeather, Amber, Vetiver, Musk, Vanilla

Ratings

Scent

8.0 (56 Ratings)

Longevity

8.5 (51 Ratings)

Sillage

7.9 (52 Ratings)

Bottle

8.4 (53 Ratings)
Submitted by Michael, last update on 19.04.2020.
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Reviews

5.5
Scent
10
Longevity
9
Sillage
9
Bottle
Galahad
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Galahad
Galahad
Top Review    5  
Does not keep what the label promises - but shoots what the label keeps
Mancera and Montale - the common DNA of both houses can be found in the name, the flacons and very well also in the fragrance creations. Since not so many perfumeries run the two houses - and in many cases only one of them - I was only familiar with the more prominent Montale for some time. The scents of this house are for me all exactly one: polarizing! Either you love creation or you despise it. Now that I've tested a handful of fragrances from both houses, I come to one conclusion - the label doesn't always live up to its promises and: less is sometimes more! The latter does not apply to the number of fragrances contained, but rather to the variety of creations that both labels throw onto the market.
Characteristic of the creations of both brands are the descriptive names, meaning that the name of the fragrance anticipates which ingredients should dominate the course of the fragrance. As already mentioned above, I cannot always agree with this naming, also in the case of Aoud Lemon Mint. Cool, marketing-optimised fragrance names such as "Viking", "Egoiste" or "Layton" are not to be found at Montale. Many of the fragrances are also categorized as unisex, including the one discussed here.
Now to the fragrance itself, the title focuses on Oud, Lemon (here converted as Mandarin and Lemon) and Mint. In my opinion, the latter can only be found in the title, it can neither be found in the list of ingredients, nor can my nose really identify it in any phase of the fragrance process. I could understand Aoud Lemon even better.
The fragrance also starts off directly with a citric note, reminiscent of green mandarins. The citric is quite spicy at the beginning, but is surrounded by a very strong sweetness, which remains for my nose throughout the entire course of the fragrance. While the sour fruit disappears after a short time, this spicy, slightly musty Oud/Patchouli sweetness remains for well over 10 hours. I applied the scent yesterday evening around 20:00 o'clock and it was still very closely perceptible the next day at lunch. Altogether the very dark ingredients dominate for me in this bright and very briefly freshly starting fragrance after only a few minutes: Oud (low dosage), patchouli, vetiver, which make the fragrance very spicy. Amber and vanilla add sweetness. No trace of mint.
The bottle, which is a feast for the eyes, therefore does not really go well with such a powerful hum, which, unlike the name suggests, is hardly bearable in summer. I see the scent in autumn, winter and on cool spring days. I couldn't stand him in the heat. In general I admire durability and Sillagemonster, but this one was too penetrating, also too stinging and too musty and above all one thing: much too synthetic.
This synthetic is my biggest reservation against Montale and Mancera so far. Nearly all fragrances tested so far stood out due to very prominent fragrances, all of which seemed very synthetic. The large number of releases also makes me a little suspicious. I would prefer some selected, really balanced and rounder fragrances. Besides, Oud - or as Montale and Mancera call it - makes it: Aoud - not every fragrance more exclusive, more complex and therefore justifiably more expensive. It simply doesn't go well with some compositions, especially not with supposedly light and fruity fragrances. Also the abundant patchouli and here animal musk distort the beautiful top note in the course.
Thus, none of the Montales and Manceras purchased so far will probably be allowed to move into the core workforce. This one also leaves me via the souk towards a new owner.
Too bad, because the bottle is a feast for the eyes, the durability of this fragrance is second to none!
1 Replies
8.5
Scent
9
Longevity
8
Sillage
9
Bottle
Jazzbob
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Jazzbob
Jazzbob
Very helpful Review    7  
Where's the mint?
Strong contrasts make perfumes really interesting. And the combination of something rather heavy like Aoud (by the way this is the correct transcription from Arabic) with fresh notes promises to be exciting. Unlike usual, there is no rose and no saffron in Aoud Lemon Mint, but strangely enough no mint either. The question arises how Mancera got the name. Aoud Lemon Almond Vanilla would of course have been a stupid, albeit more appropriate alternative.

During testing I noticed in any case a quite clear difference between the paper strip and my skin, because the freshness perceptible on the former is as so often much less noticeable on the wrist. That is why I think the current classification here is rather misleading. Either a lot of people just took the paper test or they have a different skin than me. It strikes me however generally that the classification as 'fresh' is met much more frequently than I would do it myself.

In the beginning Aoud Lemon Mint definitely looks brighter than you are used to from most Aoud fragrances. Of course the lemon sets the tone, but not as strong as expected. Coriander, which I don't like very much in high doses, blends very well into the top note here. This, and perhaps a pinch of pepper, gives the fragrance a slightly green-spicy facet, which, in combination with the lemon and jasmine, provides the lightening of the Aouds. Nevertheless, it is present for me throughout the entire process. It does not look synthetic, but very round, woody resinous, only slightly dirty and therefore darkens the fragrance a little. Just as responsible for the fact that I wouldn't meet the classification as fresh are the discreetly gourmand notes of almond, which fortunately doesn't remind me of marzipan, and vanilla. Patchouli, leather and vetiver, on the other hand, cannot be filtered out for me. When the top note fades with time, the unfortunately rather sweetened vanilla takes up a larger space, so that the base smells relatively simply of ambered musk aoud.

Nevertheless, Aoud Lemon Mint is a very successful, unusual fragrance, which I consider most suitable for spring and autumn. Animal or all too artificial Aoud nobody has to fear here, but from my point of view one is exactly at the interface between light and sweet smells with a very light dark impact - somehow everything is present at the same time. In addition, this Mancera, like many others, has a projection that is quite strong over many hours. Not a scent for every day, but for those who want to attract attention.
2 Replies

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