Moschino pour Homme 1990 Eau de Toilette

Moschino pour Homme (Eau de Toilette) by Moschino
Bottle Design Atelier Dinand
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8.1 / 1047 Ratings
Moschino pour Homme (Eau de Toilette) is a popular perfume by Moschino for men and was released in 1990. The scent is spicy-leathery. It was last marketed by EuroItalia.
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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBergamotBergamot
LavenderLavender
Clary sageClary sage
Green notesGreen notes
RosemaryRosemary
Heart Notes Heart NotesCarnationCarnation
JasmineJasmine
RoseRose
Orris rootOrris root
CarawayCaraway
Base Notes Base NotesAmberAmber
LeatherLeather
CoconutCoconut
BenzoinBenzoin
LabdanumLabdanum
StyraxStyrax
Tonka beanTonka bean
CedarCedar
OakmossOakmoss

Ratings

Scent

8.147 Ratings

Longevity

7.438 Ratings

Sillage

6.838 Ratings

Bottle

7.138 Ratings
Submitted by DonVanVliet, last update on 18.01.2022.
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Reviews

9
Scent
7
Longevity
6
Sillage
10
Bottle
8
Pricing
HugoMontez

48 Reviews
HugoMontez
HugoMontez
   1  
Great but late to the game
The first Moschino fragrance (and the best, frankly) was launched in 1990 and discontinued somewhere in the 00's. This is an example of a good fragrance that came pretty later in the party. At 1990, we already had the big wave of brutal macho leather-animalic scents that became popular among every guy. Kouros, Antaeus, Jules, etc... and the classics Cuir de Russie, Knize ten, etc... we're a bit dated too. At that time, freshness was the key and the "soup de jour". Cool Water (1988), New West (1988) or even Fahrenheit (1988) with its fresh violet leaf were great successes and Moschino wanted to enter in the perfume world. They could chose a fresh scent or citrusy one, or even a classic fougère but they opted to make something more bold and, perhaps, dated.

Allegedly created by Françoise Caron, this is basically a leather chypre scent with some spicy woods and creamy balsamics. Opens very bitter, fresh and green but with a woody sweetness underneath. As it dries down, the labdanum and styrax help intensify the leather creaminess and the scent became more rounded, a bit sweet and still, somehow, bitter. The leather here is not like a new car leather (Tuscan Leather, Ombré Leather, Etc...) neither a classical floral one (Knize Ten, for example). It's more something between the creamy greeness of BelAmi (1986) and the rich bitter leather accord of Antaeus (1981).

Very rich and multilayered, this masculine combines every bit of leather chypre compositions in the past and make it, somehow, italian. Rounded, sexy, fresh and relaxed. But it came out later in the game and no one cared. It would had been a real classic if it came out 10 years earlier.

The longevity is not beast mode, rather average but it works. It gives this relaxed Italian vibe which I think it's brilliant. 6-8h with moderate projection. If you overspray it, it would last a bit more. I think this is one of those that needs more sprays to fully enjoy it.

The good news here is that you can find pretty good deals on this one. Because it not a very well known fragrance, the prices are quite decent actually.

I recommend it as a piece of history, a relaxed version of BelAmi or just for the bottle that looks awesome, by the way. I have the Vice-versa version from 1990 (pre barcode) with Spray and Splash mechanism and it looks great!

Moschino hasn't many masculine fragrances and, apart from this, I really like Uomo? Eau de Toilette but the rest is very average, including the more recent Toy Boy . So, do yourself a favor and, if you like leathers and chypres, try to find a bottle of this gem and enjoy it.

4/5
9
Scent
9
Longevity
Intersport
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Intersport
Intersport
Top Review    11  
Who invented it?
Françoise Caron. Françoise Caron, 1990 during her employment at Roure Bertrand Dupont, says at least the recently published book 'The Handbook of Great Italian Perfumery: Fifty Years of Exceptional Scents' (2021) by Italian author and perfume blogger Marika Vecchiattini. When I hear the name Françoise Caron, I first think of the eponymous house whose Poivre and Le 3e Homme de Caron made formative impressions in my youthful encounters with perfume. Whether Françoise is related to Caron, unclear, but her name keeps popping up as a co-author of Le 3e Homme. When I think of Françoise Caron, I also think of Eau d'Orange Verte (1979) and Cuiron pour Homme (2002). Identities of perfumers - apart from cases like Guerlain, where it was clear: family business, the perfumers might as well be the Guerlain's - only came back into the conversation in the 70's 80's, Jean François Laporte's projects like Artisan and later Maitre Parfumeur are common examples of auteur perfumery of that time. Frédéric Malle's concept from 2000 to get the perfumers as authors again in the limelight has made quickly school, meanwhile it is at least with fine fragrances rather a peculiarity if the perfumer is not mentioned by name
With Moschino Pour Homme was not clear to me over 32 years who is behind it. As with many Italo releases, from the nebulous time of the late 80's early 90's. A brief moment that represents for me a peak-time of Italian men's fragrances. All herbaceous-medicinal and already slightly experimental, industrial, even kitschy, the l'air du temps of the late 80's. Post-italo disco zeitgeist, artisanal solid, a bit modern. But it didn't matter who invented it or designed it, we're talking about designer fragrances: Versace (Versus Uomo), Trussardi (Action Uomo), or even Moschino - the brand was in the spotlight.

As I said, I didn't learn about Françoise Caron's attribution to Moschino Pour Homme through a database entry, Vecchiattini's book contains one entry (1 page, two columns) on Moschino Pour Homme. Italo (men's) perfumes from the end of the 80's fascinate me; they often stood out clearly from releases from other countries, like to combine herbal, slightly conservative with playful touches, which in other places might have been considered pure heresy right away. The aforementioned Versus and Action Uomo are among them, or the Krizia triology Uomo, Moods and Spazio. Only: until now I could not find out much about the raison d'etre of these differences, especially since - as in the case of Moschino Pour Homme or Romeo Gigli's Uomo - non-Italian perfumers were involved. In short, with a 'Handbook of Great Italian Perfumery' I hoped to get some background. I first heard about the book through a review by the go-getting Miguel Matos. Matos, whose work has yet to reach me - too retro-realistic, akin to bands that want to sound like Joy Divsion but better, nevertheless embodied a potential guarantor for me because of his surely meticulous vintage studies and confessions of Italo classics like Action Uomo. Unfortunately far from it, who hopes for insights into 70's 80's and early 90's perfumery in Italy will be disappointed here. The book covers a history of Renaissance, Medici Italo-French connections, monastic and early 20th century - the essential basics - but the closer it gets to the 'now', the thinner it becomes and it gets stuck in the common sense of marketing language. Besides the relevant information on Moschino Pour Homme, the nicest part is an index on Italian perfumes from 1970 - 2020, but it also has questionable gaps, an iconic brand like Santa Maria Novella is only covered with a few entries, other, far more commercial ones are considered with all flankers and Christmas editions. A good index is a Sisyphean task, a handbook for such a wide field an even more complex one - the stated production time of a good 2 or 3 years was perhaps just too short.

Back to Moschino. This perfume is far from experimental, and that is where its difference lay. Franco Moschino was at times the Italian
Counterpart of the enfants terribles, as it was gladly endeavored for Gaultier. From today's perspective, perhaps for what Vetements or Balenciaga try with sampling. The sublabel Moschino's called itself 'Cheap & Chic', there were peace signs, copyright symbols, acid house smileys, slogans like CONDOME, in short, it united even arch-enemy Armani hardcore minimalists and Versace baroque followers in a common enemy image. Moschino Pour Homme was a very classic eau de toilette, a kind of leather chypre that is too often compared to Bel Ami - for me that never worked, it's like weighing an Hermes silk tie or horse blanket from the 80's (Bel Ami cocktail times) against a Moschino costume from 1990. Does not compute. Sure, there's overlapping content, but workmanship, production, impact and message are fundamentally different. Yet Moschino Pour Homme is not at all cheap, perhaps not even tres chic: it's leathery-floral, far spicier across the board than, say, Bel Ami, slightly chypry, with a dazzling aldehydic opening and balsamic drydown. The bottle and packaging were far closer to Moschino's principles: Die-cut gold paper, ying&yang, playing card motifs, spray, pour as well as a 'vice-versa' version that would combine spray and pour mechanisms for the first time. Most recently, Je suis un homme or Eau de Gloire made me think of this Moschino - albeit with clearly perceptible differences. Sometimes I still see the scent in pharmacies that still have aftershaves and eau's somewhere in the bottom row, dusted but surprisingly well preserved: Françoise Caron's wonderful Moschino Pour Homme.

7 Replies
9
Scent
7.5
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
7.5
Bottle
Drseid

808 Reviews
Drseid
Drseid
   2  
When The 90s Become The Great 80s...
Moschino pour Homme goes on with aromatic lavender with a faint slightly animalic castoreum laden leathery undertone. Moving to the early heart a strong green oakmoss emerges as co-star with the castoreum, labdanum and styrax derived animalic leather, with the aromatic lavender remaining as diminished support, joined by significant carnation and slightly powdery rose florals. During the late dry-down the composition eschews its florals and most of the oakmoss, leaving dry leather sans its animalic facet as sole star through the finish. Projection is very good and longevity excellent at around 12 hours on skin.

Moschino pour Homme may technically be a 90's composition, but stylistically it takes me back to my favorite decade of perfumery, the 80s. The composition starts off with a tremendous hit of aromatic lavender, but even from the start the animalic leather peeps into the open, asserting itself early. By the time the composition moves to its middle, the animalic leather takes command, though with a very strong oakmoss co-star. The combination of the leather and oakmoss tandem with the supporting carnation and rose florals is absolutely superb smelling. By the time the composition moves to its late dry-down the leather sheds its animalic castoreum infusion, utilizing the remnants of the styrax and labdanum to create its dry leather finish with maybe just a touch of tonka bean derived sweetness, but not much. The leather dry-down is fabulous, completing the wonderful experience provided top-to-bottom. I have heard Moschino pour Homme compared to Puredistance M and vintage Bel Ami by some, but I really don't see much similarity between them (aside from them all being superb smelling leather compositions). A bit closer to my nose, though still quite different is Leonard pour Homme, a composition composed a decade earlier and one of the best leathers ever created. When a composition is compared to so many leather greats, you know the perfumer has done something right, and Moschino pour Homme can rightfully take its place alongside those great leathers of past and present with pride. The bottom line is the under $100 per 100ml bottle on the aftermarket discontinued Moschino pour Homme is an excellent example of how to do a leather composition right, representing one of the best offerings of the 90s and earning an "Excellent" to "Outstanding" 4 to 4.5 stars out of 5 and an extremely strong recommendation.

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