OscarOscar de la Renta 1977Parfum

Version from 1977
Oscar / Oscar de la Renta (1977) (Parfum) by Oscar de la Renta
Bottle Design Serge Mansau
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7.7 / 10     112 RatingsRatingsRatings
Oscar is a popular perfume by Oscar de la Renta for women and was released in 1977. The scent is floral-spicy. The longevity is above-average. It was last marketed by Parfums Stern / Parfums Phénix.
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Fragrance Notes

Top Notes Top NotesBasil, Cascarilla, Coriander, Orange blossom
Heart Notes Heart NotesBroom, Jasmine, Rose, Tuberose, Ylang-ylang
Base Notes Base NotesCastoreum, Myrrh, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Vanilla, Vetiver

Ratings

Scent

7.7 | 112 Ratings

Longevity

8.1 | 86 Ratings

Sillage

7.1 | 80 Ratings

Bottle

7.8 | 90 Ratings
Submitted by Loreley, last update on 17.08.2020.
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Reviews

10
Scent
7
Longevity
7
Sillage
9
Bottle
Oriane

113 Reviews
Oriane
Oriane
   2  
Beautiful Floriental
Oscar is the first perfume by Oscar de la Renta. It was created by Jean-Louis Sieuzac (who also created the legendary Opium) in 1977 and won the FiFi Award in 1978. It is described as "a classic, floral, slightly sharp perfume of aromatic notes of lavender, rosemary and carnation, with sweet, powdery, musky base notes."

Top Notes: Coriander, Orange Blossom, Peach, Gardenia, Bergamot, Cloves, and Basil.

Heart Notes: Rosemary, Cyclamen, Carnation, Tuberose, Lavender, Orchid, Jasmine, Ylang-Ylang, Rose, and Iris.

Base Notes: Sandalwood, Amber, Patchouli, Lavender, Opoponax, Coconut, Cloves, Veytever, Myrrh, and Musk.

I first wore Oscar in the very early 1980s, and it was so beautiful. Whilst it is still a beautiful fragrance, it has obviously been reformulated, and it does not smell quite the same as it did whence first I wore it. Now, it has a sort of "cardboard" smelling note that I truly dislike; however, I still like it overall, and I still keep it in rotation. Projection, sillage, and longevity are not as good as they once were, either, so reapplication may be necessary after three to four hours on skin.

Oscar is a very feminine, very romantic floriental fragrance. I read that it was supposed to be similar to Guerlain L'Heure Bleue. I do not find it especially similar to L'Heure Bleue, but it is a wonderful fragrance and a classic in its own right.

I do not find it either woody or aromatic. It is more floral, spicy, and a bit powdery to my nose. It is sweet but not candy sweet. I LOVE the carnation in this which is a bit sweet. The dry down is lovely despite the "cardboardy" note I find in it now. In fact, the entire composition is beautiful from top to bottom notes, sans the cardboard note.

On my skin, the projection is moderate; the sillage is moderate+; and, the longevity is good--easily four to five hours. I am surprised at how affordable is Oscar EdT given how nice it is. I purchased a new 3.3 oz bottle of it on eBay for only $20 plus shipping. It was a much more expensive fragrance whence I wore it in the 1980s, and as I recall, I wore an EdP of it in those days that I do not find available now for some reason. Today, Oscar is an affordable masterpiece within reach of even the most budget conscious amongst us.

If you like feminine florientals with good projection, sillage, and longevity, I do not see how you could go wrong with Oscar. It is appropriate for all seasons and would work well during both the day time and the night time. It is a pretty scent that has nothing offensive about it whatsoever. I think it would be appropriate in virtually any venue including an office setting. It is elegant, feminine, and very ladylike. Personally, I do not see gentlemen wearing this one as it is so feminine. Highly recommended.

Fragrance: 9/10

Projection: 8/10

Sillage: 8/10

Longevity: 7/10
8.5
Scent
8
Longevity
7
Sillage
7
Bottle
MasterLi

375 Reviews
MasterLi
MasterLi
Helpful Review    4  
Beautifully soft & elegant floral...
This is a fragrance which has significance to me, as it was my mother's first signature scent and favourite perfume. This one comes from an age where perfumes didn't need to be cloying or sugary sweet, but which emphasised nature and femininity.

Oscar by Oscar de la Renta is a wonderful perfume done in a very elegant style of perfumery. Like a white floral bouquet of jasmine, tuberose, lilly-of-the-valley & gardenia. There is also a spicy base of amber, myrrh and opoponax. I also get ylang-ylang and herbs and a few aromatic florals. What a mix!

This is a perfume for someone dressed up in my opinion, but it would also make a great signature scent and a spring/summer favourite. It is quite floral but at no point is this fragrance ever overwhelming. It is done with such style and mastery that you can tell it was not made today, but in a golden age of female marketed perfume. Incredible stuff! This is worth a try if you like floral bouquets and wedding/special occasion perfumes. Elegant and floral and never overwhelming. If you're interested in a classic yet youthful style, then try this one.
jtd

484 Reviews
jtd
jtd
Helpful Review    4  
Oscar
Perfumer Jean-Louis Sieuzac made some of the most memorable and influential perfumes of the 1970s-1990s.

Yves Saint Laurent’s era-defining Opium (1977) smothered the oriental genre in spice, making the previous big-girls like Shalimar and Youth Dew seem quaint. In the 1980s Sieuzac skipped the match, but piled on the gasoline to redefine leather with the twin brutes Hermès Bel Ami (1986) and Christian Dior Fahrenheit (1988). As if to stuff the genie that he released with Opium back into the bottle, in 1991 he composed Christian Dior Dune, an eerie beauty that gives me a shiver every time I put it on. It has the jarring capacity to make opposing qualities fit together that renders it both off-putting and seductive. In retrospect, Dune is the the perfume that sat aloof and alone at the cusp of the 80s and 90s. It managed simultaneously to refer to the disproportionate scale of 1980s perfumery yet usher in the sense of concession and atonement of the perfumes of the early 1990s.

In 1977 Sieuzac also made Oscar for Oscar de la Renta. Though it won the 1978 Women’s Fragrance of the Year Fifi Award it was overshadowed by its its own sibling Opium, which crushed everything in its trajectory. Compared to Opium, whose name and scent suggest the unquestioning pursuit of pleasure (ahhh…the 70s), Oscar’s terse mixed floral tone might well have coined the phrase ‘old lady perfume.’ Oscar is a sharp, starched white floriental perfume that leans more toward the dry sting of carnation and the remoteness of gardenia than the lushness of jasmine or tuberose. Opium’s relationship to tradition was to break from it by surpassing it. Oscar could not have been more different in its aspiration. It was in the lineage of Caron Bellodgia, Dior Dioressence and Guerlain l’Heure Bleue—perfumes that might not have been intended to be distant, but came to be seen as remote standard-bearers. In fact Oscar shares l’Heure Bleue’s classic bittersweetness with a similar midpoint between glacé resinousness and acrid powder. It is a potent, almost forceful fragrance but its tone was so conservative compared to its contemporaries that wearing it gives the sensation of falling backward, stepping away from the accelerating dynamic of the late 1970s.

I doubt that a lot of people in the late 70s wore both Opium and Oscar. They capture the two sides of what would very soon come to be called America’s “culture war.” Sieuzac deserves great credit for straddling this nascent divide and creating two exceptional compositions in the process. It cannot have happened inadvertently. Oscar suited the de la Renta brand’s goal of dressing the ladies-who-lunch, the women who aspired to the society-set. Opium captured the Yves Saint Laurent brand’s desire for a new chic: the androgyny, the Studio 54 vibe, the casual affluence.

Perfume’s language is an openly debated question in 2015. Jean-Louis Sieuzac’s perfumes from 1977 comment subtly but precisely on this issues of the day and are a record of how perfumery speaks and can be read. It’s unfortunate that in 1977 the work of the perfumer wasn’t publicly attributed to him. Within the next two decades that closet door would start to open. Better late than never, my hat is off to Jean-Louis Sieuzac.

(Based on an excellently preserved bottle of eau de toilette from the early 1980s.)

from scenthurdle.com
5
Scent
7.5
Longevity
5
Bottle
Katad

58 Reviews
Katad
Katad
Helpful Review    3  
Oscar - breaking up is hard to do...
My favorite 1980's date scent revisited in 2013. Things have changed over the years.

Huge soapiness and green at the opening, which fades to a gentle floral. I don't get too many of the listed notes, mostly just floral sweetness. What was once luscious to me now just feels banal. Maybe I have a reformulation as Sherapop has suggested. It didn't trigger any memory nodes for me either, which is a clue as scent memory is usually quite accurate. Oh well, another one bites the dust. My tastes have changed.

Sorry, Oscar, we have to break up. It's not you, it's me.
2 Replies
Krmarich

24 Reviews
Krmarich
Krmarich
   5  
Exotic BRILLIANCE
I have detected Oscar here and there in my lifetime on various ladies. I found a vintage splash bottle dated 1977 this fall and have no problem wearing it as a man. I snatched it up, needing to experience the original masterwork. The bottle is iconic!

This is really a floriental that has been around since L'Heuer Bleue. Indeed Oscar loved it so much he launched this loving update into a commercial success that would appeal to American as well as European fans. Gone is the emotional heaviness of LB. It gets replaced with glamour.

Rich resin surround a redolent tropical bouquet of tuberose, jasmine, rose, gardenia and exotic orchids. It sits on a luscious bed of creamy amber, sandalwood, coconut, myrrh that if I am not careful, I may take a sip. Its anything but gourmand. Elegant, graceful and just plain wonderful.

It is retro, yet stylish as ever! Oscar is a very formal affair and if it has been a part of your life, you are very priveledged.
1 Replies
10
Scent
7.5
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
10
Bottle
LadyRogue

166 Reviews
LadyRogue
LadyRogue
   1  
Lovechild with its own beauty
If "Fidji" & "Moschino Moschino" had a love child, my nose thinks it would smell like Oscar. It's a wonderful blend of the two and I wear it when I am not in the mood for either, but yet want something like it.
This doesn't mean that it's not a beauty in its own right! Far from it. It has character without being too heavy and it's playful and floral without being too sweet. They had a child & named it Oscar. I love it too. : )
9
Scent
7.5
Longevity
7.5
Sillage
7.5
Bottle
Lola82

362 Reviews
Lola82
Lola82
   1  
Disco in a Bottle
The wisp of musk woods and resins Transport you to the darkly lit smokefilled room filled with smoky quartzed mirrors Disco music flowing
in sync with the bright lights. Mingling
with the rich and famous. Circa 1977
if you want something with Nostalgia
you'll love this perfume the ultimate
70's Perfume.
6
Scent
7.5
Longevity
5
Sillage
Missk

1165 Reviews
Missk
Missk
   1  
Lady-like and clean floral
I expected Oscar to be quite rich and heady however this fragrance is refreshing and somewhat soapy.

I can't say whether I like it or not, its complexity and overwhelming freshness has me a little confused.

I think it may be the blend of white florals (which I adore), mixed in with the herbaceous notes of coriander, basil, rosemary, lavendar and patchouli that appears to be shocking to my nose. However, don't get me wrong, this is a pleasant scent, just something that I'm not particularly used to.

After the rather green and strong opening, Oscar develops into something quite powdery and soft, which is certainly appealing. I can now see why Oscar is hailed as a classic.

I must make it known that this fragrance has amazing lasting strength, and I mean amazing. I could smell this on me even after a shower at the end of the day when I had first applied it in the morning.

Despite the fact that this fragrance isn't my cup of tea, I certainly recommend this scent. Very lady-like in my opinion.
1 Replies

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