Sucre d'Ébène (2010)

Sucre d'Ébène by Pierre Guillaume
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Sucre d'Ébène is a perfume by Pierre Guillaume for women and men and was released in 2010. The scent is sweet-gourmand. It is still in production.

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Fragrance Notes

Benzoin, Brown sugar, Hamamelis, Vanilla, Orange blossom

Ratings

Scent

7.1 (86 Ratings)

Longevity

7.3 (67 Ratings)

Sillage

6.3 (60 Ratings)

Bottle

7.1 (59 Ratings)
Submitted by Louce, last update on 11.07.2019

Interesting Facts

The fragrance is part of the collection "Huitième Art", which was renamed "Collection Noire" in 2018.

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Reviews

6.0 7.0 7.0 7.5/10
DonJuanDeCat

0 Reviews
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DonJuanDeCat
DonJuanDeCat
Helpful Review    7
With enough sugar to seize power to get many women!
Yes, my title might sound a bit strange again, but I had to think of the Simpsons by the name, or better said by the term "sugar". Why, I'll tell you only after the description of the fragrance, so you don't have to bored yourself to get away :D

So, today I'm describing a fragrance by Pierre Guillaume, the Sucre d'Ébène from the Huitième Art Collection, which is mainly about brown sugar. The peculiarity of the Huitième Art fragrances is, by the way, that here vegetable "ingredients" (like sugar here) in organic, i.e. as real ingredients are supposed to combine with synthetic fragrances. This is supposed to create a synergy of biological essences and synthetic scent chords. Well, as fragrance descriptions are, all this sounds interesting as always. Stupidly only that some smell descriptions also with less succeeded smells always seemingly a totally inspiringly described and marketed are always :D

But we'll see how this smell smells!

The fragrance:
I smell sugar right from the start. And in fact the brown sugar, which seems to have a slightly stronger scent than "normal" white sugar. But of course you can also say that you can just smell sugar, that's easy to notice here, especially if it sometimes reminds you of cotton candy from the fair. In addition I smell the benzoin, the fragrance is therefore slightly resinous, but above all velvety and soft. The background of the fragrance is somehow slightly woody and nutty. This woody-nutty scent becomes a little bit more almondy-like later.
A little later, vanilla notes are added, which are initially like sugar in intensity, but then become somewhat stronger towards the base. Especially with its almondy-like scent, vanilla later looks a bit like cinnamon biscuits or hot, milky drinks such as coffee and the like. Finally, one smells the vanilla and the brown sugar most, which becomes a little stronger again in the base after it came over a little weaker in the middle part. The third, but weakest main fragrance is the almond (which, by the way, says goodbye first). The very late base also smells a little milky, even like crème brûlée, as Mantus already wrote here. All in all a beautiful, warm scent. However, it is neither particularly outstanding, nor all too boring.

The Sillage and the shelf life:
The Sillage is good because you can easily smell the scent on one. Over time, the Sillage naturally weakens, but which fragrance doesn't?
The shelf life is long, the fragrance remains on the skin for at least eight to ten hours.

The bottle:
Hm, apparently the bottles here have been changed into rectangular bottles in the meantime, which I think is a pity. The earlier bottles still had slightly bloated and rounded ceramic-look bottles, but now, as I said, they come in a rectangular bottle covered in a shiny black colour, with a round brownish-black label on the front showing the name of the fragrance. These are the same flacons used for the Générale perfume range. Too bad, because a little individuality of the individual fragrance series of the brand is lost.

Okay, the scent basically smells like its name suggests: sweet sugar. And of course other sweet notes like vanilla, combined with a nice almond note. I like him, even if he's not a high flyer. If you like sugary notes, you should try this scent here, because sugar is one of the main scents here, which still radiates in the base of the scent for a long time. In any case, it is a fragrance for autumn and winter, although it should be used in small doses perhaps also on not too warm spring days. I think it's nice, but as I said, you have to like sugar as a fragrance, because you can smell it intensively here. I like to use it especially for going out or in my spare time. So, just test it out :)

So... what's the deal with my title now?
Well... it's possible I've been watching a little more "The Simpsons" lately. And because of the term "Sucre" I just had to think about a certain episode of this series. As a result, Homer Simpson finds sugar on the street, drags everything into his garden and tries to sell it in bags. When he nods off exhausted as he guards his sugar mountain, you finally hear him babble in a strange accent: "In America you have to have enough sugar before you can seize power. Then you can get all the women you want!"
I always found this sentence so great and funny, it belongs for me to the great sayings at the Simpsons, e.g. just like the saying of Tingeltangel Bob, who says on his chest in English "Die Bart, die! (so "Die Bart, die!") and was able to convince the court jury that the saying was German and that it was simply "Die Bart, die" (now pronounced in German) :D

Well, that's it from me again. See you next time! :D
2 Replies
10.0 8.0 8.0 8.0/10
Tar

261 Reviews
Tar
Tar
1
Don't be shy!
From burn coal to pink flowers and back to sugary asphalt... quite a long way, isn’t it?

Give SUCRE D’ÉBENE enough time. At first bite it bites back. Roasted caramel, brown sugar, dark and heavy odor is the beginning. Later on a ton of flowers oppresses the olfactory. The narcotic sweetness remembers me to the Harujuku style, it is definitely too much, too pink, too intensive, but I still like it. At the end I get a sugary and roasted asphalt, and am still fond of it.

I respectfully say thank you to Huitieme Art and Pierre Guillaume for being enough brave to create such an exaggerated scent, that is
- strong
- lasts long
- funny to imagine it on men
- and resembles to Love (Don’t be shy) by Kilian.
ColinM

516 Reviews
ColinM
ColinM
1
Panettone in a bottle
The opening of Sucre d’Ebène is a sharp, rich, and I guess totally involuntary tribute to Milan’s most renowned traditional cake – the “panettone”, which is basically something like a fluffier, tastier and more buttery sponge-cake we use to eat here around Christmas and on New Year’s Eve. Sucre d’Ebène instantly reminded me of its sweet brownish crust, and more specifically when you take the cake home and reheat it the oven, the crust getting even more “burnt”. Which is nice, just I wouldn’t want to go to the cinema smelling like that. In April, for instance, or mid-July. Anyway, Sucre d’Ebène basically a sort of “autumnal” dry and shady gourmand, all played on aromatic, earthy, woody and sweet notes of “caramelised” dry resins and sugar, coffee, nutty notes, roots, woods, dry resins, with a bolder, darker woody aftertaste and something salty and sweaty underneath (I guess due to that “roasted” feature). Nuclear power, and endless linearity. To some extent it is undoubtedly fascinating, a peculiar melancholic and “forest” gourmand all played on brownish tones – woods, coffee, caramelised sugar, cake crust... but in my opinion it is also sadly a bit too heavy, fairly boring after a while, and frankly just too oppressive to wear.

6,5/10
7.5 5.0 7.5 8.0/10
Flavorite

240 Reviews
Flavorite
Flavorite
Helpful Review    4
A Sweet and Tender Hooligan
This is for an adult who likes sweet smelling burnt brown sugar notes but doesn't want to smell like a teenager. Picture a coffee crumble cake with bits of light brown sugar encrusted along the edges perfectly...then picture leaving that crumble cake on the table while you go to freshen up by washing your face with cool water and drying with a clean town and then splashing an astringent toner solution your clean skin, then going back to have a tasty piece of that brown sugar coated coffee crumble cake. Finally a Witch Hazel fragrance I can sink my teeth into! This is too sweet for me to wear everyday. But it titers on the edge of cloyingly sweet so tenderly, I'll give it a chance. A soft smooth powdery dry down follows. All-in-all a sweet taunting high quality topping for waffles. This is yummy, sexy and somehow so sly!
4 Replies

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