Le Canotier

Le Canotier by Rogue
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7.4 / 1023 Ratings
Le Canotier is a perfume by Rogue for women and men. The release year is unknown. The scent is green-spicy. The production was apparently discontinued.
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Perfumer & Creative Guidance

Manuel Cross (Brand Owner, Perfume maker)

Fragrance Notes

Haitian vetiverHaitian vetiver
BergamotBergamot
Bitter orangeBitter orange
Violet leafViolet leaf
Blond tobaccoBlond tobacco
JasmineJasmine
MossMoss
AmbergrisAmbergris

Ratings

Scent

7.423 Ratings

Longevity

7.920 Ratings

Sillage

7.321 Ratings

Bottle

7.114 Ratings
Submitted by Carlitos01, last update on 04.08.2021.
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Reviews

7.5
Scent
9
Longevity
7
Sillage
Profumo
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Profumo
Profumo
Top Review    18  
Picnic with straw hat

The Canotier is a straw hat with a straight brim, which enjoyed great popularity especially in the first half of the 20th century.
The fragrance of the same name, although created decades later, goes wonderfully with this hat. Both give the impression of "outside", of sun and wind, of country life, of being in nature.

Manuel Cross, the fragrance rebel from California, uses all kinds of green scents, but also bitter and fruity citrus notes, light aromatic accents and a few flowers to convey this association. Blond tobacco, fresh grassy violet leaf and green-spicy vetiver are the centre of the fragrance at first, accompanied by hay and tart fruit, before the classic chypre base gradually grounds the fragrance and a touch of ambergris lends it body and delicacy.

When I sprayed 'Le Canotier' for the first time, I was a bit irritated by the confusion of the individual notes, which somehow don't really want to amalgamate. It wasn't a real cacophony either, the different voices are singing a similar theme, but they have a lot of intonation problems: Use, rhythm, volume, everything seems uneven and uncoordinated. Especially when I remembered which scent 'Le Canotier' reminded me of: it was Patricia de Nicolaïs 'Vie de Chateau'. Also a fragrance that celebrates the sunny country life, wonderfully matching Claude Monet's 'Breakfast in the Green'.
However, the fragrance of Madame is perfectly orchestrated. She, who grew up in the house of Guerlain, can do it like no other: blend the notes seamlessly with each other and still let naturalness shine through them. For for all the sophistication of the composition, her scents never give the impression of artificiality and strict structure, but always retain a natural aura and casual liveliness.

Le Canotier is also alive. There is nothing static about it, everything is in motion. But it lacks a little bit the organizing hand, the director in the background, who is invisibly pulling the strings.
But, what the hell. The smell is always nice. It just lacks a little bit of polish, or rather the centring. At first I didn't know where the fragrance wanted to go, what it wanted to be: a tobacco-hay scent, a vetiver, a woody chypre?
After some time I suspected that he wants to be everything, but due to the unjointed veneer it does not become clear so quickly. The scent is in constant danger of falling apart.
The fact that it does not disintegrate completely in the end is due to the use of an enormous amount of oak moss. Non IFRA-compliant oakmoss, which thanks to Atranol and Chloratranol can still fulfil its function as a fixative to the full extent. The uninhibited use of this material, so beloved of Manuel Cross, ultimately brings peace and order to this fragrance and brings it to a conciliatory end.

For oakmoss fetishists, 'Le Canotier', like some of Rogue Perfumery's other fragrances, is an absolute must and a revelation. You can use them to study what this fragrance is capable of (or was capable of in this country), and what a poor substitute we have gotten used to by now.
Fortunately, the situation is slowly improving in our country - more adequate substitutes are being used, as well as a fragmented but still usable oak moss. But if you sniff at 'Le Canotier', 'Chypre Siam' or 'Fougère l'Aube', you can still get the impression that Manuel Cross is sticking his tongue out across the Atlantic with relish: Burn! Look: this is the smell of a real Chypre! You can't do it anymore, but I can True to his motto "Bureaucrazy destroys art!", he doesn't care about bureaucracy He's right! Br />
Nevertheless I stay with Madame de Nicolaïs wonderful 'Vie de Chateau', which reliably elicits a little 'Wow!
Le Canotier' is not able to do that - oakmoss or not...
8 Replies
8.5
Scent
10
Sillage
Drseid

797 Reviews
Drseid
Drseid
   0  
Rogue Taking A Walk On The Modern Side...
Le Canotier opens with a slightly bracing, bitter-green orange bergamot and violet leaf tandem before transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart, the sharp-green violet leaf recedes but remains, now joining dulled orange in support of an emerging lemon-like woody vetiver that takes the fore. During the late dry-down the composition development stays relatively linear as the vetiver remains the star, only softening slightly as time passes as the violet leaf vacates to reveal an underlying mild, natural smelling tobacco leaf in support through the finish. Projection is outstanding, as is longevity at well over 15 hours on skin.

Le Canotier is somewhat of a departure from most of the Rogue offerings by talented perfumer Manuel Cross. While most of the line focuses on compositions of the past, with many the *distant* past... Le Canotier feels quite modern in style and structure by comparison. I can see how one going into smelling the composition expecting a more classical structure based on the others in the line could walk away surprised and disappointed by the perfume, but this writer finds the sharp, lemony vetiver-centric modern perfume to be quite compelling and intoxicating regardless. The perfumer's deft use of the supporting blonde tobacco to take a bit of the edge off the vetiver as time passes is a particularly interesting and wholly successful choice, with the combination working well when sniffed up close on skin, but even more effective in the sillage. The bottom line is the $110 per 60ml bottle Le Canotier may be a stark departure for perfumer Cross, but in no way an unwelcome one, earning an "excellent" to "outstanding" 4 to 4.5 stars out of 5 rating, and an easy recommendation.
8.5
Scent
8
Longevity
7
Sillage
8
Bottle
Maggy4u

76 Reviews
Maggy4u
Maggy4u
   0  
21st Century Dandy
Le Canotier is a vetiver scent. And yet Manuel arranges classic ingredients of a chypre around jasmine, violet and blonde tobacco. It gives this fragrance a well-groomed, balanced dandy aura, as a counter part to all the hustle and buzzing of our time.

Named after a flat straw hat for men, which became fashionable especially in the 1920s and quickly became the epitome of the modern man of that time, this fragrance perfectly combines the echoes of classic colognes with modern, balanced freshness and lots of tobacco. The use of oakmoss and ambergris gives the scent an additional subliminal attractiveness and sensuality, which I like a lot. The result is a perfume that is striking and flattering, and at the same time stands for a timeless image of a gentleman.

Le Canotier was reissued by Manuel for a short time.

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