Flora & Fauna 2020

Flora & Fauna by Rogue
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8.5 / 1040 Ratings
Flora & Fauna is a new perfume by Rogue for women and men and was released in 2020. The scent is chypre-fruity. The longevity is above-average. The production was apparently discontinued.
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Perfumer & Creative Guidance

Manuel Cross (Brand Owner, Perfume maker)

Fragrance Notes

BergamotBergamot
LabdanumLabdanum
OakmossOakmoss
AmberAmber
Dried apricotDried apricot
CivetCivet
PatchouliPatchouli
LeatherLeather

Ratings

Scent

8.540 Ratings

Longevity

8.032 Ratings

Sillage

7.333 Ratings

Bottle

8.431 Ratings

Value for money

7.912 Ratings
Submitted by TheDrake, last update on 28.10.2021.
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Reviews

10
Scent
8
Longevity
7
Sillage
9
Bottle
Profumo
Translated Show originalShow translation
Profumo
Profumo
Top Review    35  
Without pompous pomposity
Manuel Cross has proved that he can do chypre, especially old style chypre, with 'Chypre Siam', 'Tabac Vert', '40 Rogue' and 'Tuberose & Moss'. Whoever sniffs at these creations may completely forget that only a few years ago there were fierce debates about the pros and cons of banning oak and tree moss. A touch of 'Chypre Siam' and it's as if nothing had happened.
Well, he doesn't give a damn about the restrictions of an IFRA in faraway America. Let the pitiful colleagues on the old continent struggle to breathe new life into the good old, unfortunately assassinated Aunt Chypre - at his home she is still very much alive.

Now then, flora & fauna
I confess to having blindly ordered this fragrance, but what could happen: a new chypre fragrance from Mr. Cross, even advertised by the US-American online retailer Luckyscent as "...masterpiece of all-natural perfumery" - nothing could go wrong.

Didn't work either.

Flora & Fauna' is exactly what I had hoped for, and yes, even a little bit expected: a classic Chypre of the finest kind! The fragrance even surpasses its predecessors already mentioned - which in turn were, or are, already convincing representatives of this genre. With them, Manuel Cross illuminated the corners of the chypre cosmos: sometimes the green-spicy corner, sometimes the powdery-animal, or the Asian-floral. But 'Flora & Fauna' rests within itself, occupies the middle of the room, so to speak, or in other words: probably wants to and should be read as the quintessence of his struggle for an old-style chypre fragrance, one that only gently opens up to modernity and above all shows his own signature.

Of course, there are two heroes of the past that cannot be ignored in moderation: Coty's epochal 'Chypre', and Jacques Guerlain's answer to it, the no less epochal 'Mitsouko'.
Chypre Siam' can be seen in many ways as Manuel Cross's attempt to reinterpret François Coty's fragrance. Flora & Fauna', on the other hand, could be understood as a wooing for 'Mitsouko'. For Jacques Guerlain's ingenious trick was to juxtapose the bitter-mossy background noise of the chypre construct with a ripe fruit with its sweet-tart, even leathery nuances: the peach.
Manuel Cross chooses the apricot instead, or as a variant: a supposedly dried apricot.
And you can smell it right at the beginning of the fragrance, but hello! it literally jumps at you, and holds the bitter-shelled, citrus-fresh bergamot right underneath. This bitter-sweet fruit duo literally dances on the balsamic, softly ambered heart, which in turn is surrounded by a strong base of labdanum and oak moss.

Of course, the juicy apricot accord is a very clear hint towards 'Mitsouko', only that 'Flora & Fauna' is less madam-like, but rather more delicate and light-footed.
This may be due to the missing flower bouquet. Mitsouko' holds a whole bouquet in her arms: rose, jasmine, ylang-ylang, even lilac. The rogue scent: nada. There are no blossoms far and wide, at least none that would push themselves into the foreground. Manuel Cross has disarmed, or rather: ruffled off, so to speak. And lo and behold: the slimmed-down concept is working.

Whereby I wonder a little bit about the naming: 'Flora', which Flora? Well, also mosses, lichens and resins belong to the flora. But please, which 'fauna'?
I'm actually getting a little suspicious here Manuel Cross advertises this fragrance by saying that it is 'all-natural'. Seriously? Even the civet, which is supposed to be in it, and which you can only guess at quietly?
Genuine, natural civet?
I hope not Because as good as 'Flora & Fauna' smells, the use of real civet would disqualify this scent to a certain extent. A quiet bad conscience is already gnawing inside me, because of my rogue-chypre-enthusiasm, that I pressed the buy-button so fast...
Well, I'll find out, and until then I hope that the 'all-natural' doesn't really refer to 'all'.

Apart from the only subtly used civet, the leathery nuances of the 'fauna' must of course also be added. But when combining leather and chypre in this case, please do not think of genuine leather chypre à la 'Bandit' or 'Cabochard'. The leathery touch here is more of a team player than a protagonist, rather soft, light leather than rough and dark.
Here, 'Flora & Fauna' reminds me a bit of 'Diorling', whose leathery sides are similarly finely smoothed and softly scented, while the base doesn't develop the warmth of the Rogue fragrance at all. This, however, develops another recent chypre scent, Annette Neuffer's 'Chyprette', also 'all-natural'. Perhaps Manuel Cross was inspired by this one, because it is striking that barely a year after the Neuffer fragrance was released, Manuel Cross is coming around the corner with his own. While 'Chyprette' is of course purely natural, the explicit reference to the naturalness of 'Flora & Fauna' surprises me a little bit, because Manuel Cross was known for his resistance against bureaucratic regulations, but less for his inclination to natural perfumes.

In any case, the aim of his efforts was apparently to prove to himself and all sceptics that a chypre fragrance on a purely natural basis, without the use of synthetic substitutes, is feasible.

He succeeded
However, it is also understandable that the whole thing has its price. As Annette Neuffer explains on her website, natural extracts cost many times more than their synthetic substitutes - the differences are really enormous! So it should come as no surprise that you have to pay a little more for a bottle of 'Flora & Fauna' than for other rogue fragrances, which in turn already contain a high proportion of natural ingredients.
As a small compensation for the surcharge, you will not only be rewarded with a high quality fragrance, but also with a pretty little wooden box that opens and fits the contents perfectly: fine and noble in a pleasant way, without any hint of pompous pomposity.

Bravo!
16 Replies
8.5
Scent
8
Longevity
6
Sillage
8
Bottle
Drseid

798 Reviews
Drseid
Drseid
   2  
A Wink to the Past, Blazing a Trail of Its Own...
Flora & Fauna opens with a tangy apricot and bergamot fruit tandem with just a touch of underlying supporting green oakmoss before gradually transitioning to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the bergamot recedes, but the oakmoss enhanced apricot fruit remains, adding moderately dulled rose and slightly powdery orris to the mix, with just slightly sweet, leathery, ambery labdanum, and a hint of animalic civet support. During the late dry-down, the fruity floral aspects recede though never completely vacate, leaving the leathery, ambery labdanum from the base to take on the starring role, with the slightly animalic civet also remaining, bolstering the labdanum's leathery facet further with a touch of earthy patchouli and the remaining oakmoss support to round things off through the finish. Projection is good and longevity excellent at around 12 hours on skin.

I tend to shy away from all-natural compositions, as usually the perfume lacks depth, performance metrics or most commonly both. It was with that pessimistic outlook that I tried Flora & Fauna, the first all-natural release from the extremely gifted perfumer Manuel Cross. Now having worn the composition on skin a few times, I can safely say both composition quality and performance are *very* much intact. At its core, Flora & Fauna has old school classically structured floral-leather chypre written all over it, with its fruity apricot and bergamot open with oakmoss never the star but detectable throughout, and its sublime leathery labdanum led dry-down. Some have compared it to classic Guerlain masterpiece compositions like Mitsouko and L'Here Bleue, but while I can see where they are coming from, I find Flora & Fauna to be distinctive enough that it stands on its own, while staying reverent to those past greats. The fact that Mr. Cross could accomplish all this without using any synthetics to at least bolster performance is nothing short of a marvel. The bottom line is the $150 per 30ml bottle Flora & Fauna owes some of its classic structure to past greats, but the "excellent" to "near-masterpiece" 4 to 4.5 stars out of 5 rated perfume blazes new distinctive trails of its own to impress anew, earning it a strong recommendation to any lover of classically structured floral-leather chypres (all-natural or not).

Statements

BoBoChampBoBoChamp 2 months ago
9
Scent
9
Longevity
7
Sillage
Initially pungent and soapy citric-fruity, this warm and creamy, yet gently leathery, fruity Chypre, settles to a resinous earthy-woody base
RisingChaosRisingChaos 3 months ago
6
Scent
6
Longevity
6
Sillage
Deep peachy moss opening. Touches of leather, civet, and patchouli give a dank sort of depth. Very similar drydown to Chypre-Siam.

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