Himalaya by Scriabin in the Himalayas
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8.8 / 104 Ratings
Himalaya is a limited perfume by Scriabin in the Himalayas for women and men and was released in 2015. The scent is smoky-green. The longevity is above-average. It is still available to purchase. Limited Edition
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Fragrance Notes

FrankincenseFrankincense
AmberAmber
Woody notesWoody notes
Oriental notesOriental notes
NagarmothaNagarmotha
VanillaVanilla
Jasminum auriculatumJasminum auriculatum
SpikenardSpikenard
Ozonic notesOzonic notes
Musky notesMusky notes

Ratings

Scent

8.84 Ratings

Longevity

8.03 Ratings

Sillage

7.73 Ratings

Bottle

7.04 Ratings
Submitted by Michael, last update on 25.07.2021.

Interesting Facts

200 pieces were made.
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Reviews

9
Scent
8
Longevity
8
Sillage
7
Bottle
Floyd
Translated Show originalShow translation
Floyd
Floyd
Top Review    42  
The Himalayan sky
Here in the sky the chlorine blue shadows shine brightest, myriads of nascent ice crystals waft in clouds like incense from Tibetan temples, citrusy mist hisses in time-lapse across the peaks, drives paddocks of small animals downhill, there in the distance. Up on the ridge Hemingway's Himalayas head, fresh soil falls from roots of the Nagarmotha, bubbling blossoms like streambeds so tart and bitter, crusting to earth in wandering amber, to the bottom of a mountain lake among cloves and woods in water-mirroring swirls with the plunging shadows of bright sky.
¡@!*
In 1915, Russian composer Alexander Scriabin planned a 7-day concert in a purpose-built temple at the foot of the Himalayas, in which music combined with poetry, visual stimuli (for example, a color organ), and fragrances would usher in the spiritual transformation of humanity to dissolve the world in divine bliss - a truly ambitious apocalypse. 100 years later, several musicians and monks adapted his plans in a monastery in Kashmir. Michel Roudnitska was entrusted with the creation of the fragrances: "I immediately accepted to compose an olfactory score of 6 fragrances and a special limited edition perfume for this exceptional event. It was an old dream to discover Ladakh, its mysterious old monasteries, highest passes of the world (5350 m and 6000 m) and gorgeous wild lakes in desert lands..."

https://www.cafleurebon.com//wp-content/uploads/2015/08/91GivingHimalayatotheheadmonkofthemonastery.jpg
(Handing of the fragrance by Roudnitska to a monk)

"Himalaya" combines an ethereally bright, citrusy-cool incense, underscored by slightly chlorine-like ozone notes, with the earthy aromas of nagarmotha roots as well as the bitter-tart notes of nard. Airy musk contributes slightly animalic notes, and the jasmine blossom combines rather coolly with the amber, light woods and some clove. Everything floats, as if Roudnitska has preserved the thin, misty air of the Himalayas to transport the wearer to this awe-inspiring landscape for over eight hours.

(With thanks to Bloodxclat)
39 Replies
10
Scent
8
Longevity
7
Sillage
7
Bottle
Pigfarmer

11 Reviews
Pigfarmer
Pigfarmer
Helpful Review    2  
utterly unique sense of space
roudnitska jr is clearlt talented but to conjure the sense of being at the higest altitudes while remaining grounded on the necessary vagaries of solid perfumery, well that's just goddam voodoo. i treasure my bottle and wear only when i'm clear for a reasoanble degree of solitude and introspection. fantastic work, and no need to ad to what my friend jtd can say much more ellekwentlee... :)
jtd

484 Reviews
jtd
jtd
Very helpful Review    5  
an event
Synesthesia has made a mark on perfumery thanks to artists like Dawn Spencer Hurwitz and Bruno Fazzolari. They experience scent as color. Their work in perfumery ranges from depiction of their experience (Chroma) to more abstract exploration. The audience can speculate as to what synesthesia ‘feels’ like, but the work doesn’t induce a synesthetic experience. The early 20th century Russian composer Alexander Scriabin apparently wanted the audience to experience the phenomenon more directly. Though it never came together during his lifetime, a days-long performance that incorporated music, dance, aroma and light took place at an elevation of 11,800 feet at the Thikse Buddhist Monastery in the Ladakh, India in June of 2015. “Mysterium” was a symbolist approach to the Vedic principle of divine energy animating and linking all aspects of being. The people present for the event were considered celebrants as much as audience members.

Michel Rounitska composed a number of scents that were integrated into the performance. He also composed Himalaya, a perfume tribute to the Mysterium project. The perfume conjures a cold, arid climate. The chilly, metallic olibanum is aerated with ozonic materials to create a sensation of cool winds. It has light, sweet vanillic tone that is balanced by a yogurty tartness. A floral quality floats in the air but never lands. It enhances the incense but stays in the background. An almost fruity aspect appears when the sweetness inherent in olibanum is brought out. Frankincense is the clear center of Himalaya. All other notes circle it and point to it but they never take center stage.

Scriabin’s piece has some of the early 20th century exoticism that flirts with fetishizing the foreign. I’m thankful that Roudnitska chose not to take an orientalist approach to the perfume. He chose a material that is appropriate to the setting (frankincense) and then used it to express an introspective, contemplative attitude.

Intermedia events might seem like a contemporary topic, but Scriabin beat us to the punch by about 100 years. Whether creating a performance that explicitly incorporates all the senses will lead to a synesthetic experience for the audience is an open question. Hallucinogens might help.

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