MatuxMatux's Perfume Reviews

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Matux 5 months ago 1
10
Scent
8
Longevity
6
Sillage
5
Bottle

Bozzy and woody, leaning femenine
Only three notes that I cannot detect clearly. What I do smell are boozy topnotes and woody / lactonic mid and basenotes. The blend is somehow complex, full bodied and original when it comes to orientals. As a matter of fact, the one from Fueguia I enjoy the most.

Now, the version I have is plain EdT. I had the parfum, unfortunately it was stolen. To my memory there are analogies between both, however, the perfume was more enticing - I could detect notes more clearly and the blend's evolution was way more complex.

There are points in common with others from the house, that makes me think that the house's nose might be after a signature note.

On a scale with four points (femenine, leaning to femenine, leaning to masculine, masculine) the composition "lends to femenine".

Matux 5 months ago 1
9.5
Scent
8
Longevity
7
Sillage
9
Bottle

A stronger version of Eau Sauvage, the old fashioned way
I can get the idea: Eau Sauvage, being fleeting, deserved a flanker delivering what the original did not: who does not want more of a good thing? Well, here it is.

The problem was solved with stronger top notes, I can detect basil playing around the lemon and from then on a spicy citric composition leaning in favor of the hesperidic notes: aldehydes, indeed. Leave the orris root, jasmine, coriander, laurel, rosemary and sandalwood behind. As to the basenotes, the same. Point in case, ES Concentrée does not show much complexity when compared with the original, not a bad thing.

Something is gained, some punchiness, longevity and projection; something is lost, complexity.

A good option for the Summer and the Spring if you find the original somehow bland.

Matux 5 months ago 1
9.5
Scent
4
Longevity
10
Sillage
5
Bottle

Your favorite citrus aromatic, now with leather
Not much to say as to those from decades ago that were blended after classic EdCs - citric topnotes morphing into floral midnotes and leading to leather. "Cedar" leads to misunderstandings for the very simple reason that is absent.

Many consumers buy fragrances with the idea that projection extending meters and neverending longevity are the attributes that justify high prices. This is correct nowadays, but that was not the case decades ago: men were supposed to smell fine and that meant scents to be smelt when close, the other way around was the choice for women. Besides, Eau Sauvage (ES) is blended after citric notes, and these are fleeting.

All this result in the fact ES is short lived and discreet, that would make ES the right option for those that think that too much is too bad - classy people that run away from notoriety as if it were the pest.

So, lovers of Mancera's Red Tobacco et al of the kind... this is not for you.



Matux 6 months ago 1
5
Scent
9
Longevity
4
Sillage
10
Bottle

Not Fahrenheit, really
There are aromatic notes, some myrrh. I cannot trace the leather albeit the frankincense. Oriental notes, indeed; no oud so far - at least of the kind in YSL's M7 or "banyard" kind of oud I recall from a sample of one of those blended by a well known middle eastern house.

It projects quite faintly, it is tenacious. Medium complexity; even though it has a medicinal accord, it settles to a really nice soft skin scent that provides much of what is not provided upon application - balance. Not honest when it comes to distinctly identifiable notes and accords, still quite original.

As to the hype that comes with discontinued scents, better look somewhere else. There must be a replacement for this.

PS: One of the statements mentions that this can be replaced by Lalique's Hommage a L'Homme, a blend with prominent violet notes. It is right - Lalique's lacks the dark tones this Fahreheit has, take out the woodiness and focus the blend in florals and there you get Hommage a L'Homme.

Based on this I have to recognize that Fahrenheit's violet DNA is still present in this flanker. However, this version does not bloom in terms of projection the way the original does.

If having to choose a violet themed blend, I would choose the Lalique.

Matux 6 months ago 1
10
Scent
10
Longevity
10
Sillage
8
Bottle

Spicy gourmand for all
Be aware that on a blotter it smells different re. on the skin: while in the first smells flat, on the skin smells complex.

As to the second option, I can clearly notice the cardamom and the black pepper on the top notes; they morph into flowery notes that feel somehow akin to the way citrics smell to the nose, I would describe this as an "acute" feeling that is opposite to balmy descriptors.

As to the pyramid, this should be the violet, but it is not so if I take as a reference violets in Grey Flannel or Lalique's Hommage a L'Hommme; I'd rather say it smells or feels like the notes in common between Dior's Sauvage and Armani's Code, a woody molecule that is somehow screetchy.

The base notes lead to gourmand territory, unknown to my nose - I can describe it in a generic way, that would be a spicy chocolate, in my imagination, mole poblano (a chocolate soup with chili).

It is not elegant, subdued, discreet, classy; rather strong and bold, as a matter of fact, it reminds me a lot of Axe's Dark Temptation or Axe Oud and Vanilla. Not a bad thing at all, as a matter of fact, it would be my choice in really cold weather days provided it is applied with discretion. ​

An excelent alternative if looking after a value for money for those into no-frills contemporary kind of scents.

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