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The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

9 years ago
Skin does not chemically react to anything, let alone fragrance.


Then why do some skins erode and discolor various metals?
9 years ago
I am a layperson and not a chemist. But something baffles me. How is the human, original, personal scent emitted from the skin? Through the pores?

Does an applied perfume just SIT on top of the skin, like a layer? Or is it ingested, absorbed by the skin???

When scented body lotion is applied, does it not SINK into the skin, thus it is absorbed?

When a perfume oil (oud products) is applied, is it not absorbed, ingested??

When the alcohol based perfume which contains some oil nevertheless, is applied, does not the alcohol evaporate and the small remnants of oil are absorbed into the skin?

My argument is that if the perfume (as stated above) is ingested, absorbed, blended, mixed ... whatever ... with the skin, then there has to be a "marriage" simply put, and that could be different from person to person.

When so many perfume professional talk about skin chemistry, there must be something to the theory that perfume just ever so slightly change on the skin.

We are possibly not using the same terms of expressing the blending of the perfume with the skin.

Why are you so insistant about that there is nothing, nothing whatsoever??
Last edited by Pipette on 16.12.2013, 02:41; edited 1 time in total
9 years ago
" In the perfume industry, however, the effects of skin chemistry on perfume are taken for granted. It matters and it affects the way fragrance develops. Every round of fragrance mods (a series of new trials) needs to pass a skin test, and every meeting with the customer includes a time when the fragrance is smelled on the skin. Some perfumers insist on smelling their compositions on several different people before making further decisions."

Directly from the article I linked. I forget which house Victoria works for. Pipette may know.
9 years ago
Lol, I give up. Good luck with your issues.
9 years ago
I don't know which house Victoria works for, have no insider knowledge.

But, it would be nice, if a perfumer would weigh in with an opinion.

Paul Kiler? Andy Tauer?

Is anyone reading?
9 years ago
I give up, too.

I cannot get through to you that there are subtle differences between people's skins.
9 years ago
Cruella:
Cryptic:
Skin does not chemically react to anything, let alone fragrance.


Then why do some skins erode and discolor various metals?

because of SWEAT not the actual skin, and nobody wears perfume when they are sweaty, so it still doesn't proof anything.

I wear perfume when I'm sweaty. I sweat every day and I wear perfume every day. I work outside with the birds and the trees, I don't think they mind.
My fragrance is fresh in the morning right out of the shower, when my body temperature heats up, the fragrance magnifies itself. When I am really drenched in sweat, I can barely smell it but it's there because I always spray on the tips of my shirt collar which is also sweaty.
At the end of the day when my body is cooling down, I catch tiny whiffs of my fragrance again. It may be mixed with sweat and body odor but I recognize it as the fragrance I am wearing that day.
9 years ago
Psst... don't tell anyone, but I wear perfume to the gym. Shocked
9 years ago
Cryptic:
Lol, I give up. Good luck with your issues.

Very Happy To learn is never too late, but it is often pointless.

9 years ago
http://science.howstuffworks.com/perfume2.htm

It looks like a line has been drawn under the debate but I just found this article and wanted to add it for interest's sake.

I think the point is that, while body temperature and oiliness impacts on the speed of evaporation of perfume, an individual's skin does not alter the actual molecular structure of the perfume.

This is my definition of 'chemistry': If the skin changed the actual molecular structure of a perfume on a person to person basis that would be 'chemistry'. I am not sure that is the case.

Good to read all the perspectives!
9 years ago
Yeah - I'm married to a Scientist so I guess some of that rubs off. Lol. I do love any discussion around the science of perfume.
9 years ago
His specialisation is environmental science and, more specifically, water. He agrees that it must result in a change to the molecular structure of the perfume to be considered chemistry. He agrees the skin warmth and degree of oiliness does affect the speed with which it is evaporated and how long it lasts but apparently what differentiates top, heart and base notes is the 'weight' of the molecules. Top notes are light and evaporate quickly and so on with base notes the 'heaviest'. I don't understand this detail.

He said imagine a perfume that changes on a molecular level according to each individual's skin. It would be a rare and fascinating thing to try. Is that what the 'Molecule' perfumes purport to do?

he is on board with the differences in scent receptors as the reason for different perceptions of scents.
9 years ago
Cruella:
Perfumecrazy:
His specialisation is environmental science and, more specifically, water. He agrees that it must result in a change to the molecular structure of the perfume to be considered chemistry. He agrees the skin warmth and degree of oiliness does affect the speed with which it is evaporated and how long it lasts but apparently what differentiates top, heart and base notes is the 'weight' of the molecules. Top notes are light and evaporate quickly and so on with base notes the 'heaviest'. I don't understand this detail.

He said imagine a perfume that changes on a molecular level according to each individual's skin. It would be a rare and fascinating thing to try. Is that what the 'Molecule' perfumes purport to do?

he is on board with the differences in scent receptors as the reason for different perceptions of scents.

What is a molecule perfumes? Is that a brand?

And he has a point, imagine if skin changed perfume on a molecular level, NO PERFUME would ever smell the same! Perfumers would make a formula, release it and it would transform into billions of variants that are not what he created. That is why skin chemistry is so ludicrous and ridiculous, but alas people insist in believing it exists.

Yes - precisely his point. You would never be able to predict how a perfume would smell if they responded differently to every individual's skin - it would be as individual as fingerprints.
yes - Escentric Molecules Molecule range. I've not tried them so not sure what their story is.
9 years ago
"But what about your chemistry? Your temperature and oiliness seem most important. The top notes will evaporate faster from warm and dry skin than cool and oily skin. Otherwise, by the time the heart notes emerge, the perfume smells the same on everyone [source: Turin and Sanchez]."

I seriously doubt that The Holey Sick Book (Trademark Sherapop) has ever been cited as authority for anything here at Parfumo, so congratulations are probably in order. Laughing
9 years ago
Cryptic:
"But what about your chemistry? Your temperature and oiliness seem most important. The top notes will evaporate faster from warm and dry skin than cool and oily skin. Otherwise, by the time the heart notes emerge, the perfume smells the same on everyone [source: Turin and Sanchez]."

I seriously doubt that The Holey Sick Book (Trademark Sherapop) has ever been cited as authority for anything here at Parfumo, so congratulations are probably in order. Laughing

Yeah - Luca Turin is only a biophysicist so he might be confused about biochemistry and the science of perfume. There's room for doubt.
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