Foren-Übersicht Men's Perfume do cheaper scents require more applications?
Newbie
Newbie
2 Posts
NewbieNewbie do cheaper scents require more applications? 28.09.2013, 14:57
Hi, I've only recently started applyimg eau de toilette and my problem is that I work a very long day. I've bought some Bulgari Man which is very nice but I find that in order to still smell the fragrance at the end of the day I have to apply between 15 and 20 sprays at the beginning. At this rate I will get through my supply very quickly and I may have to get something cheaper next time. I was thinking about Cerruti 1881 which someone recommended. Does anyone know whether I will have to apply as much of that scent to get me through the day? Also, I smoke heavily and I'm wondering whether this is stopping me smelling the scent, would this be right?

Sleuth
Sleuth
500 Posts
SleuthSleuth 28.09.2013, 16:55
Mostly it doesn't depend on the price, but it depends on the fragrance. Citrus lasts only a little while. Spices last medium long. Vetiver (Cerruti 1881) can last a long time, that too depends on which fragrance. So it also depends on the fragrace 'note' (the kind of scent)

In my opinion, 15-20 sprays is too much. In your case I would buy a travel sprayer to take fragrance with me, that way you don't have to apply 15-20 sprays in the beginning. Or just use a (scented) deodorant for the 2nd part of the day.

Yes, it really depends a lot on the fragrance itself and on the notes. Online there are lists with fragrances that last a long time. Some of my favorites are:
- Versace Dreamer (vanilla/tonka, affordable)
- l'Eau d'Issey by Issey Miyake (clean, lasts more than 8 hours)
- Le Male by Jean Paul Gaultier (pleasant vanilla + lavender)
- Also 'Old fashioned' scents can last a decent while, try Davidoff Zino (rosewood + patchouli), look for a bargain.
- If it fits your character, the super spicy Opium pour Homme by Yves Saint Laurent also lasts longer than 8 hours.
Last edited by Sleuth on 29.09.2013, 11:31; edited 1 time in total

Omni
Omni
235 Posts
OmniOmni 29.09.2013, 08:05
Try Declaration by Cartier or Azzaro Pour Homme. I hope you find something more suitable than the weak and musky Bulgari, a fragrance that did not find favour in this household, by him, or her.

Dolby
Dolby
610 Posts
DolbyDolby 20.10.2013, 10:09
What Sleuth said.

There is also something called "nose fatigue" and that is you getting used to the scent you are wearing and not noticing it anymore.
Others will still smell it on you however, even if you don't.

Another thing you can do is spray both on your skin and on your shirt.
Perfume remains longer on clothes.

Newbie
Newbie
2 Posts
NewbieNewbie 20.10.2013, 15:25
Thank you, kind folks, for your advice. I certainly have nose fatigue for the Bulgari. I have bought some new scents based on the recommendations on this site. I have also toned down the dosage, which must be good for those around me - although I rather miss having empty seats around me on the train to work!

TimmyJ
TimmyJ
4 Posts
TimmyJTimmyJ 27.11.2013, 01:56
I also am a smoker, and i think that it really does diminish your sense of smell ( and taste).

Oberon21
Oberon21
12 Posts
Oberon21Oberon21 04.01.2014, 23:57
bulgari man has very poor longevity on skin ,i think its not a problem of smoking or not .... i see most of the modern perfumes are very pales in longevity and sillage

Sherapop
Sherapop
1365 Posts
SherapopSherapop 05.01.2014, 05:10
It all depends... I generally find that the more abstract (= synthetic) a perfume is, the more tenacious the scent. The ultimate example being "Joop!" which boasts nuclear longevity.

I am more interested in fragrances produced through the sacrifice of at least some plant life, and I definitely prefer not be forced to change all of my linens or else suffer the nightmarish experience of smelling something like "Insolence" for multiple days. Yuck.

Surprised

Dulcemio
Dulcemio
1336 Posts
DulcemioDulcemio 09.01.2014, 00:13
Sherapop wrote:
It all depends... I generally find that the more abstract (= synthetic) a perfume is, the more tenacious the scent. The ultimate example being "Joop!" which boasts nuclear longevity.

I am more interested in fragrances produced through the sacrifice of at least some plant life, and I definitely prefer not be forced to change all of my linens or else suffer the nightmarish experience of smelling something like "Insolence" for multiple days. Yuck.

Surprised


Laughing Yeah, longevity is a double-edged sword, isn't it. I also agree with offing some plants. That's what they live for. Smile

I know I sound like a broken record, but I have found that where I spray on my body plays a part in avoiding nose fatigue. My tummy - that's the magic spot. Neck, cleavage, behind the ears - these are all too close to my nose. The tummy seems to be the correct distance to waft up nicely through the filter of my clothing all day without overhwelming my receptors.

Deefit
Deefit
25 Posts
DeefitDeefit 15.03.2014, 20:21
In my experience the pricetag means nothing. I know expensive scents that are so incredibly weak and I know very inexpensive scents that are strong beyond belief.

Tessa
Tessa
101 Posts
TessaTessa 17.03.2014, 23:09
Not sure smoking may have something to do with the wearing out of the smell of your perfume.
The suggestion of having a travel spray with you is the best bet.

Deefit
Deefit
25 Posts
DeefitDeefit 18.03.2014, 10:56
Smoking affects your skin, so in the long run I'd imagine it would have some effect.

MichVaillant
MichVaillant
7 Posts
MichVaillantMichVaillant Re: do cheaper scents require more applications? 03.02.2015, 06:11
Newbie wrote:
Hi, I've only recently started applyimg eau de toilette and my problem is that I work a very long day. I've bought some Bulgari Man which is very nice but I find that in order to still smell the fragrance at the end of the day I have to apply between 15 and 20 sprays at the beginning. At this rate I will get through my supply very quickly and I may have to get something cheaper next time. I was thinking about Cerruti 1881 which someone recommended. Does anyone know whether I will have to apply as much of that scent to get me through the day? Also, I smoke heavily and I'm wondering whether this is stopping me smelling the scent, would this be right?


Not all cheap (affordable) fragrances need a lot of application, just as not all expensive fragrances perform well with little application. Some affordable fragrances that are good performers in my experience are:
- Most Jacques Bogart fragrances (both vintage/discontinued and current offerings); for example One Man Show Gold Edition is known to be an extremely good performer, to the point of being annoying to some, I understand.

- Most Ted Lapidus fragrances (both vintage/discontinued and current offerings); for example, Black Extreme. Spray it in this room and they will know in the next room; true story.

- Sung Homme (current version; I have not tried the vintage, but I cannot imagine it performing worse.)

- Some Cuba-Paris offerings; Gold, Prestige, and Royal, in particular. However, be careful with this house. Not all Cubas are known to be good performers; for example, the ones in the City Collection and Latin Collection. Also, I have seen remarks that recent batches of Gold, Prestige and Royal are less powerful. I am aware that the packaging has changed, which sometimes may signal reformulations.

- A range of others, such as Krizia Uomo (current is not as powerful as vintage, but still a good performer), Bijan Men (ditto), CK One Shock ("shockingly" powerful for a CK fragrance).

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