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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   19.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

Best/worst/weirdest new perfumes of 2013?

...I don't mind being your enabler Sweetgrass - what is special about Rogue and makes it worth trying is the lemon blossom overlaying the suede. It's a very good scent. I get glimpses of BV but my expectations were probably too high so I didn't give it a fair chance. Do try it yourself :-) You know you want to...PS The best description of my experience of Rogue is a review on Fragrantica by En Fragrance Delicto - 'Gucci Rush meets sugared lemon'. But with suede. Or 'a bite of leather' as the reviewer put it.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   19.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

Best/worst/weirdest new perfumes of 2013?

...Best - this is hard... I just tried "Nero Assoluto" and it's *very* good but I have a tendency to develop crushes on the last perfume I tested.Worst - "Rogue". Not horrid - just disappointing. It wasn't a "Bottega Veneta" ring-in for me.Weirdest - "Peety"? Weirdest concept in any case.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   18.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

Frags so good you can't find an occasion to wear them?

...I wear "Cuir de Russie" to the supermarket and "Fantasy" to board meetings so I am not selective about occasion. I go with what I want to smell that day. It's all about me! Lol. And my perfumes are there to be used. I would sob to find a perfume had gone off when there was still heaps of it left in the bottle.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Just 3 quick things because this has become tiresome:- 'salt' is an ionic compound if you mean table salt. Hence why it is crystalline. There are about 1000 other salts. If anyone's skin is exuding table salt seek medical attention now. Sweat is mostly water with some other bits and pieces, minerals etc including minute traces of sodium etc- I often walk about and clearly recognize perfumes on various people. Does this mean they have precisely the same body chemistry as me? The same odor fingerprint? - look up olfactory receptors - read about how our brains are programmed to perceive smells - our skin only changes the rate at which perfumes evaporate and how long they last. If you sweat a lot the water will wash off the perfume.It's not rocket science but it is science.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

Re: Random thoughts
...Pipette:The world of scents is a potpourri -1. The perfumer's imagination and intent to create a work of art.2. The hype of advertising.3. The interaction of scent with the skin.4. The perception of one's own scent after application of perfume.5. The perception of other people's scent after application of the same perfume. 6. Nostalgic memories play a part how satisfying the perfume experience is.Scientifically seen, perfume is nothing more than juice composed by a chemical formula.Fantasies - that is another matter. Advertising plays into the need for fantasies.The perfumer gets a brief: "Here, create this ... make it so that it sells to as many as possible."The perfumer has a dilemma.The consumer - ultimately - judges with how much money leaves the wallet.That's beautifully written Pipette. You seem to have captured some of each perspective there and drawn them together. Nicely done.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Cryptic:Congrats on your university education! I never brag, so I'll leave it at that. Good day to you and good luck.Thanks! :-)
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Cryptic:Perfumecrazy:Cryptic:Epimedes:Dear all:If you really want to get answers from the scientific literature, you have to use proper terms for your queries. "Skin chemistry" is not a formal scientific term but a type of jargon used by perfumistas, it will not give you useful hits.A lot of research has been done on how fragrance reacts with human skin. Unfortunately, many of the papers are put by their publishers behind the paywall and/or (predictably) in French. But here's a couple of examples that have free previews of some pages.Amen. I pointed out the same thing pages ago. Thanks for reclaiming science, as it was in danger of extinction.Did you read them? The reference is to 'diffusion rates' and possible absorption (as the skin is a barrier note the reference to damage etc). They don't actually support what you have been trying to assert.I did. We don't speak the same English. One article noted that they factored in sebum and pH, as I said should be considered. I understand that you have a very narrow, limited definition of what constitutes a chemical. I do not. Salt is a chemical commonly found on the skin, for instance. I doubt anyone would dispute that. I saw no reference whatsoever to nasal receptors, moreover.You're quite right. My university education is not allowing me to accept your view or find the level at which I can help you to understand mine. I was about to explain that salt is not a chemical but I stopped myself.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Pipette:If the label "skin chemistry" is a misnomer,then we need a new label that emcompasses behavior as far as development or process. Further, there were large discussions on the German site where the debate ranged about behavior of the skin = interaction with a perfume vs. the approach of the person who sniffs = perception. All that is in German and much to the point of what we are discussing here.Dannyboy/Louce/Ronin - are you reading?That would have been interesting to read Pipette. I wish I could read German. If any German members who were involved could post here in English it would be good.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Cryptic:Epimedes:Dear all:If you really want to get answers from the scientific literature, you have to use proper terms for your queries. "Skin chemistry" is not a formal scientific term but a type of jargon used by perfumistas, it will not give you useful hits.A lot of research has been done on how fragrance reacts with human skin. Unfortunately, many of the papers are put by their publishers behind the paywall and/or (predictably) in French. But here's a couple of examples that have free previews of some pages.Amen. I pointed out the same thing pages ago. Thanks for reclaiming science, as it was in danger of extinction.Did you read them? The reference is to 'diffusion rates' and possible absorption (as the skin is a barrier note the reference to damage etc). They don't actually support what you have been trying to assert.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Thanks for these. They support what we've been saying which is that certain qualities of skin change how quickly perfumes evaporate or how long they are retained but they don't alter the perfume's molecular structure to create markedly different outcomes on different people. The difference in perception of odours is rooted in the olfactory, not integumentary, system. When I read a review on a perfume and someone describes specific scent impressions that I don't get on my skin that's my olfactory receptors. These also change over time. Even minor changes can make a huge difference to the way you perceive scents. Hence why we can be repelled by perfumes we once loved etc.Any insistence on the existence of 'skin chemistry' flies in the face of science.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Cryptic:I can't wait until Sherapop's book comes out. One of my favorite Sherapop Manifestos ever: The Turin Takedown.http://salondeparfum-sherapop.blogspot.com/search?q=skin+chemistryBut... Science *is* literal. And allergies are an immune reaction. I could go on.Still, no 'skin chemistry' which makes perfumes smell differently on different people. It's about scent/olfactory receptors which are located, not on your skin, but in your nose. Sorry! I think we in the science camp will have to agree to disagree with you.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Cryptic:"But what about your chemistry? Your temperature and oiliness seem most important. The top notes will evaporate faster from warm and dry skin than cool and oily skin. Otherwise, by the time the heart notes emerge, the perfume smells the same on everyone [source: Turin and Sanchez]."I seriously doubt that The Holey Sick Book (Trademark Sherapop) has ever been cited as authority for anything here at Parfumo, so congratulations are probably in order. :lol:Yeah - Luca Turin is only a biophysicist so he might be confused about biochemistry and the science of perfume. There's room for doubt.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Cruella:Perfumecrazy:His specialisation is environmental science and, more specifically, water. He agrees that it must result in a change to the molecular structure of the perfume to be considered chemistry. He agrees the skin warmth and degree of oiliness does affect the speed with which it is evaporated and how long it lasts but apparently what differentiates top, heart and base notes is the 'weight' of the molecules. Top notes are light and evaporate quickly and so on with base notes the 'heaviest'. I don't understand this detail. He said imagine a perfume that changes on a molecular level according to each individual's skin. It would be a rare and fascinating thing to try. Is that what the 'Molecule' perfumes purport to do?he is on board with the differences in scent receptors as the reason for different perceptions of scents.What is a molecule perfumes? Is that a brand?And he has a point, imagine if skin changed perfume on a molecular level, NO PERFUME would ever smell the same! Perfumers would make a formula, release it and it would transform into billions of variants that are not what he created. That is why skin chemistry is so ludicrous and ridiculous, but alas people insist in believing it exists.Yes - precisely his point. You would never be able to predict how a perfume would smell if they responded differently to every individual's skin - it would be as individual as fingerprints. yes - Escentric Molecules Molecule range. I've not tried them so not sure what their story is.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...His specialisation is environmental science and, more specifically, water. He agrees that it must result in a change to the molecular structure of the perfume to be considered chemistry. He agrees the skin warmth and degree of oiliness does affect the speed with which it is evaporated and how long it lasts but apparently what differentiates top, heart and base notes is the 'weight' of the molecules. Top notes are light and evaporate quickly and so on with base notes the 'heaviest'. I don't understand this detail. He said imagine a perfume that changes on a molecular level according to each individual's skin. It would be a rare and fascinating thing to try. Is that what the 'Molecule' perfumes purport to do?he is on board with the differences in scent receptors as the reason for different perceptions of scents.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...Yeah - I'm married to a Scientist so I guess some of that rubs off. Lol. I do love any discussion around the science of perfume.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...http://science.howstuffworks.com/perfume2.htmIt looks like a line has been drawn under the debate but I just found this article and wanted to add it for interest's sake. I think the point is that, while body temperature and oiliness impacts on the speed of evaporation of perfume, an individual's skin does not alter the actual molecular structure of the perfume. This is my definition of 'chemistry': If the skin changed the actual molecular structure of a perfume on a person to person basis that would be 'chemistry'. I am not sure that is the case. Good to read all the perspectives!
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   16.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The end of a love affair-Scents that have lost their magic ?

...I accept that individual human scents exist but not the 'chemistry'. I had also wondered why, then, do scents smell differently on different people and why my perception of scents change over time. To that end I recently found and posted a news article on this forum which explains that differences in perception of scents is down to different people having different scent receptors rather than chemistry. Makes more sense than the concept of 'skin chemistry'. I can't find any research on that to prove it exists. It is an interesting debate! And maybe changes in my scent receptors is why I no longer love "Jardins de Bagatelles".
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   14.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

The most beautiful and well-crafted Flacons

...I love this thread. It's an absolute feast for the eyes. Beautiful bottles are all part of the overall attraction for me of the perfumista experience but I rarely, if ever, give any thought to who designs these beauties. I also love the Guerlain 'bee' bottles.
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   09.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

Do perfumistas fuel a renaissance in high-end perfumery?

...Thank you - what a good article!
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<mark>Perfumecrazy</mark>Perfumecrazy   04.12.2013 | Miscellaneous

Help! My Laundry Smells Like Oud!

...I lavish my home and loved ones with scent - I constantly have essential oils / scented candles on the go at home. I am burning a Sandalwood candle right now. I love scented fabric softeners (I think I have found a sublime combination at the moment - Radiant Colour Care liquid + Earth Choice Pure Soft = wonderful smelling laundry).I love smelling perfume on people. My garden is full of scented flowering plants and herbs and as I sit here now I can smell Mint, Gardenia and Mock Orange wafting in from my garden on the evening breeze.I think beautiful scents enhance my life and environment. By the same token, I find unpleasant smells physically distressing and kind of depressing.
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